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U.S. Microwaveable Packaging 2012 to 2016

Abstract

"U.S. Microwaveable Packaging 2012 to 2016" reveals that one factor driving U.S. market growth is the rapid adoption of microwaveable packaging within food product categories that require increased packaging functionality. This study evaluates many proven applications for microwaveable packaging, and highlights several food industry segments that are growing faster than the industry as a whole: vegetables, desserts, prepared meals, pasta, and pizza.

The study encompasses retail and food service packaging. It provides in-depth market segment profiles that analyze market drivers and key trends, as well as projected segment-by-segment market forecasts to 2016. Innovative technologies are described which will open new markets by providing consumers with faster and more convenient microwave cooking solutions. The study also includes numerous listings and descriptions of recent packaging developments, many of which are just entering the marketplace.

This study was written for:

  • Converters
  • Raw Material Suppliers
  • Equipment and Machinery Suppliers
  • Package Developers
  • Brand Owners
  • Industry Analysts

Table of Contents

Markets, Economics, Environmental Impact, and Technology

Section I: Introduction

  • A. Microwaveable packaging defined
  • B. Study organization
  • C. Geographic regions
  • D. Methodology
  • E. Conventions

Section II: Executive Summary

  • A. Market drivers and trends
    • 1. Product expansion
    • 2. Convenience where its needed
    • 3. Price
    • 4. Over packaging
  • B. Primary packaging volume segmented by end-use
    • 1. End-use
    • 2. End-use summary
    • 3. Distribution temperature
    • 4. Heating method
    • 5. Package type
  • 6. Materials
  • C. Technology
    • 1. Vents
    • 2. Susceptors
  • D. Economics and environmental
    • 1. Paperboard analysis
    • 2. Retort stand-up pouch analysis

Section III: Technology

  • A. Microwave cooking
    • 1. Commercialization
    • 2. Impact on packaging
  • B. Package designs
  • C. Rigid trays
    • 1. Dual-ovenable rigid trays
    • 2. Microwave-only rigid trays
  • D. Bowls and cups, microwaveable-only
    • 1. Barrier bowls and cups
    • 2. Production methods
    • 3. Suppliers
    • 4. Non-barrier bowls and cups
  • E. Flexible packaging
    • 1. Popcorn bags and bowls
    • 2. Cook-in pouches
    • 3. Pouches for steaming
    • 4. Stand-up pouches
    • 5. Delicatessen foods
    • 6. Bacon packaging
    • 7. Lids
    • 8. Labels
    • 9. Shrink wrap
    • 10. Suppliers
  • F. Miscellaneous
    • 1. Bottles
    • 2. Metal containers
  • G. Material selection and use
    • 1. Use of metal
    • 2. Recycled PET resins
    • 3. Biodegradeable resins
    • 4. Temperature capabilities of materials
    • 5. Barrier properties
    • 6. Material selection
  • H. Susceptors
    • 1. Process control
    • 2. Patterned susceptors
    • 3. Manufacturing advances
    • 4. Uses in finished packaging
    • 5. Suppliers
  • I. Vents and patches
    • 1. Integral vents
    • 2. Discrete vents
  • J. Packaging filling and sealing
    • 1. Tray filling and sealing
    • 2. Thermoform/fill/seal
    • 3. Bowl filling and closing
    • 4. Horizontal form/fill/seal
  • K. Food processing technology
    • 1. Microwaveable sterilization and pasteurization
    • 2. Soft bake process
  • L. Food safety

Section IV: Economics and Environmental

  • A. Case 1: CPET tray manufacture
    • 1. Assumptions
    • 2. Economic results
    • 3. Environmental results
  • B. Case 2: CPET/RPET tray manufacturing
    • 1. Assumptions
    • 2. Economic results
    • 3. Environmental results
  • C. Case 3: Paperboard tray manufacturing
    • 1. Assumptions
    • 2. Economic results
    • 3. Environmental results
  • D. Case 4: Comparison of Case 1, Case 2, and Case 3
    • 1. Economic comparison
    • 2. Environmental comparison
  • E. Case 5: Barrier bowl manufacturing
    • 1. Assumptions
    • 2. Economic results
    • 3. Environmental results
  • F. Case 6: Barrier cup manufacturing
    • 1. Assumptions
    • 2. Economic results
    • 3. Environmental results
  • G. Case 7: Retort pouch manufacturing
    • 1. Assumptions
    • 2. Economic results
    • 3. Environmental results
  • H. Case 8: Comparison of Case 5, Case 6, and Case 7
    • 1. Economic comparison
    • 2. Environmental comparison

Section V: Market Trends and Projections

  • A. Microwaveable packaging applications
  • B. Drivers in the retail segment
    • 1. Time savings
    • 2. Convenience
    • 3. Taste and texture
    • 4. Health and fitness
    • 5. Price
    • 6. Macroenvironment
    • 7. Over packaging
  • C. Drivers in the foodservice industry
    • 1. Time savings
    • 2. Convenience
    • 3. Price
  • D. Primary packaging volume segmented by end-use
    • 1. Baby food
    • 2. Bakery
    • 3. Breakfast
    • 4. Desserts
    • 5. Dinners
    • 6. Entrees
    • 7. Entrees - Hand-held
    • 8. Pasta
    • 9. Pizza
    • 10. Popcorn
    • 11. Pot pies
    • 12. Prepared meals
    • 13. Sandwiches
    • 14. Snacks
    • 15. Soup dry
    • 16. Soup wet
    • 17. Vegetables
    • 18. Other
  • E. Value segmented by end-use
    • 1. Market share
    • 2. Growth rate
  • F. Primary packaging volume by distribution temperature
    • 1. Ambient
    • 2. Frozen
    • 3. Refrigerated
  • G. Microwave packaging segmented by cooking method
    • 1. Dual-ovenable packaging
    • 2. Microwave-only packaging
  • H. Primary packaging volume segmented by package type
    • 1. Bowls and cups
    • 2. Flexible packaging
    • 3. Folding cartons
    • 4. Trays
    • 5. Other
    • 6. Package components
  • I. Primary packaging value segmented by package type
    • 1. Market share
    • 2. Growth rate
  • J. Primary packaging weight segmented by package type
    • 1. Market share
    • 2. Growth rate
  • K. Primary packaging segmented by barrier versus non-barrier
    • 1. Barrier packaging
    • 2. Non-barrier packaging
  • L. Primary packaging volume by material type
    • 1. Barrier structures
    • 2. Paper
    • 3. Paperboard
    • 4. Polyester (PET) resin
    • 5. Polypropylene
  • M. Primary packaging value by material type
    • 1. Market share
    • 2. Growth rate
  • N. Primary packaging weight segmented by material type
    • 1. Market share
    • 2. Growth rate
  • O. Susceptors
    • 1. Susceptor - popcorn
    • 2. Susceptors - other
  • P. Vents
    • 1. Integral vents - popcorn
    • 2. Integral vents - other
    • 3. Discrete vents

Section VI: Packaging Supplier Profiles

Section VII: Glossary

  • Tables: 80
  • Figures: 69
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