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Functional Materials for Future Electronics: Metals, Inorganic & Organic Compounds, Graphene, CNT

Notes

Specialist chemicals and materials will reach over $50 billion in 2023. The chemistry of the new electronics and electrics is key to its future. This report is key reading for all advanced chemical and material manufacturers and developers.

The biggest markets for new and reinvented electrical and electronic devices may get commoditized first or collapse suddenly, leaving the materials suppliers high and dry. Read this report to avoid such a fate.

See how the metals aluminium, copper and silver are widely deployed, sometimes in mildly alloyed, nano, precursor, ink or other form. Those seeking low volume, premium priced opportunities can learn of other broad opportunities. IDTechEx covers in detail all the key inorganic and organic compounds and carbon isomers. IDTechEx shows how the element silicon has a new and very different place beyond the silicon chip. Learn how the tailoring of a chosen, widely-applicable chemical can permit premium pricing and barriers to entry based on strong new intellectual property.

Report Highlights:

  • See which of 15 basic formulations are used in the anode or cathode of the re-invented lithium-ion batteries of 131 manufacturers and what comes next.
  • Explore 37 families of new and rapidly-evolving electronic and electric device, spanning nano to very large devices.
  • Understand the 12 basic compounds most widely used in the new electronics and electrics and compare them with compounds exhibiting the broadest range of appropriate electrical and optical functions for the future.

The following chart shows the breakdown of most popular inorganic compounds in new electronics, including: Aluminium compound, Boron compound, Copper compound, Gallium compound, Indium compound, Manganese compound, Silicon compound, Titanium compound, Zinc compound

Most popular inorganic compounds in the new electronics by device family*

*For the full data set please purchase this report
Source: IDTechEx

(The Contents on this Website is a Condensed Version of the Original Report. To View the Complete Version, Please Request a Sample.)

Table of Contents

1. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY AND CONCLUSIONS

  • 1.1. The most important materials by three criteria
  • 1.2. Chemical giants reposition to benefit
  • 1.3. Need for de-risking
  • 1.4. The most widely useful compounds
  • 1.5. The most versatile compounds electronically
  • 1.6. Disruptive new electronics and electrics - the market pull
  • 1.7. Fine metals and semiconductors that will be most widely used - survey result
  • 1.8. Fine inorganic compounds most widely needed - survey results
  • 1.9. The inorganic compounds - detailed results for 37 families of device
  • 1.10. Allotropes of carbon most widely needed - survey result
  • 1.11. Fine organic compounds most widely needed - survey results
  • 1.12. Survey results for lithium salts in the biggest battery market
  • 1.13. Less prevalent or less established formulations

2. INTRODUCTION

  • 2.1. Elements being targeted
  • 2.2. Here come composites and mixtures
  • 2.3. Disparate value propositions
  • 2.4. Here comes printing
  • 2.5. Great breadth
  • 2.6. Fragile chemicals
  • 2.7. Challenges of ink formulation
  • 2.8. Company size is not a problem
  • 2.9. Uncertainties
  • 2.10. Inorganic vs organic
  • 2.11. Impediments
  • 2.12. Photovoltaics
  • 2.13. Examples of company activity
  • 2.14. Progress with Semiconductors
  • 2.15. Printed and multilayer electronics and electrics needs new design rules
  • 2.16. Metamaterials, nantennas and memristors
  • 2.17. The toolkit becomes large

3. THE MOST IMPORTANT EMERGING DEVICES AND THEIR REQUIREMENTS

  • 3.1. Conductive patterning: antennas, electrodes, interconnects, metamaterials
  • 3.2. CIGS Photovoltaics
  • 3.4. Electrophoretic displays and alternatives
  • 3.5. Inorganic LED
  • 3.6. Li-ion battery rechargeable
  • 3.7. Rechargeable lithium/lithium metal battery and PEM fuel cell
  • 3.8. MEMS & NEMS
  • 3.9. Organic Light Emitting Diode OLED displays and lighting
  • 3.10. Power semiconductors
  • 3.11. Supercapacitor
  • 3.12. Supercabattery
  • 3.13. Touch screen
  • 3.14. Transistor, diode, thermistor, thyristor for electronics
  • 3.15. Other devices of interest
  • 3.16. New material formats will lead to new devices

4. CARBON NANOTUBES AND GRAPHENE

  • 4.1. Carbon Nanotubes
  • 4.2. Graphene
  • 4.3. Carbon Nanotubes and graphene summary
  • 4.4. 113 Organizations profiled

5. INDIUM COMPOUNDS IN THE NEW ELECTRONICS AND ELECTRICS

  • 5.1. More than the story of ITO
  • 5.2. Key in the newer light emitting devices
  • 5.3. Quantum dots and FETs
  • 5.4. Cost and printability are challenges

6. TITANIUM COMPOUNDS IN THE NEW ELECTRONICS AND ELECTRICS

  • 6.1. Piezoelectrics, energy harvesters, supercapacitors, displays and sensors
  • 6.2. Allied topic photocatalysis

7. ZINC COMPOUNDS FOR THE NEW ELECTRONICS AND ELECTRICS

  • 7.1. Dielectric for insulation, capacitors and other devices
  • 7.2. Improving the efficiency of UV LED

8. FLUORINE COMPOUNDS FOR THE NEW ELECTRONICS AND ELECTRICS

  • 8.1. "Rechargeable lithium", alkali metal fluorides and other fluorine chemistry
  • 8.2. Fluoropolymer for solution-based OFET processing

APPENDIX 1: IDTECHEX PUBLICATIONS AND CONSULTANCY

TABLES AND FIGURES


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