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Smart Packaging Comes To Market: Brand Enhancement with Electronics 2014-2024

Electronics and electrics are already used in packaging, from winking rum bottles and talking pizza boxes to aerosols that emit electrically charged insecticide that chases the bug. Electronic medication packs record how much is taken and when and prompts the user. Reprogrammable phone decoration has arrived. But that is just a warm up. The key enabling technology - printed electronics - often used with other conventional electronics - can make new packaging and product features feasible. Consequently, many leading brand owners have recently put multidisciplinary teams onto the adoption of the new paper thin electronics on their high volume packaging. It will provide a host of consumer benefits and make competition look very tired indeed. This is mainly about modern merchandising - progressing way beyond static print - and dramatically better consumer propositions.

Consumer goods market for e-packaging devices in millions of units*

*For the full forecast data please purchase this report
Source: IDTechEx

This report reveals the global demand for electronic smart packaging devices is currently at a tipping point and will grow rapidly to $1.45 billion within 10 years. The electronic packaging (e-packaging) market will remain primarily in consumer packaged goods (CPG) reaching 14.5 billion units that have electronic functionality within a decade.

Main drivers of the rapid growth

The six main factors driving the rapid growth of electronic smart packaging are:

  • Ageing population
  • Consumers are more demanding
  • Consumers are more wealthy
  • Changing lifestyles
  • Tougher legislation
  • Concern about crime and the new terrorism
(The Contents on this Website is a Condensed Version of the Original Report. To View the Complete Version, Please Request a Sample.)

Table of Contents

1. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY AND CONCLUSIONS

  • 1.1. Benchmarking validation of figures
  • 1.2. Market sub sectors merge
  • 1.3. Reasons for the slow start
  • 1.4. Market drivers
  • 1.5. New components and creative design
  • 1.6. Emerging Technologies, Business Drivers and Insights
  • 1.7. Market Background

2. INTRODUCTION

  • 2.1. Types of packaging
  • 2.2. Why progress is now much faster
  • 2.3. Why basic hardware platforms are essential
  • 2.4. Why e-packaging has been slow to appear

3. THE NEED FOR ELECTRONICS IN PACKAGING

  • 3.1. Safety
  • 3.2. Security and reducing crime
  • 3.3. Uniqueness/ product differentiation
  • 3.4. Convenience
  • 3.5. Leveraging the brand with extra functions, brand enhancement
  • 3.6. Merchandising and increasing sales
  • 3.7. Entertainment
  • 3.7.1. Touchcode
  • 3.8. Error Prevention
  • 3.9. Environmental aspects of disposal
  • 3.10. Environmental quality control within the package
  • 3.11. Quality Assurance
  • 3.12. Consumer feedback
  • 3.13. Removing tedious procedures
  • 3.14. Cost reduction, efficiency and automated data collection

4. THE MAGIC THAT IS BECOMING POSSIBLE

  • 4.1. Printed electronics products from Toppan Forms
  • 4.2. Solar bags
  • 4.3. Smart substrates
  • 4.4. Transparent and invisible electronics
  • 4.5. Tightly rollable electronics
  • 4.6. Stretchable and morphing electronics
  • 4.7. Edible electronics
  • 4.8. Electronics as art
  • 4.9. Origami electronics
  • 4.10. The package becomes the delivery mechanism
  • 4.11. Electronic release, dispensing and consumer information

5. BASIC HARDWARE PLATFORMS NEEDED BY THE MARKET

  • 5.1. Winking image label
  • 5.2. Talking label
  • 5.3. Recording talking label
  • 5.4. Scrolling text label
  • 5.5. Timer
  • 5.6. Self adjusting use by date
  • 5.7. Other sensing electronics
  • 5.8. Moving color picture label
  • 5.9. Drug and cosmetic delivery system
  • 5.10. Ultra low cost printed RFID/EAS label

6. PRECURSORS OF IMPENDING E-PACKAGING CAPABILITIES

  • 6.1. Coming down market
  • 6.2. T-Ink and all the senses

7. EXAMPLES OF E-PACKAGING

  • 7.1. Examples of e-packaging and related uses with human interface
  • 7.2. Examples of e-packaging without human interface

8. THE TOOLKIT OF ELECTRONIC COMPONENTS FOR E-PACKAGING

  • 8.1. Challenges of traditional components
  • 8.2. Printed and potentially printed electronics
  • 8.3. Paper vs plastic substrates vs direct printing onto packaging
  • 8.4. Transistors and memory inorganic
  • 8.5. Transistors and memory organic
  • 8.6. Displays
  • 8.7. Energy harvesting for packaging
  • 8.8. Batteries
  • 8.9. Transparent batteries and photovoltaics - NEC, Waseda University, AIST
  • 8.10. Other important flexible components now available
  • 8.11. New types of component - thin and flexible

9. NFC IN SMART PACKAGING

  • 9.1. NFC background
  • 9.2. Key adoption factors
  • 9.3. Conclusions: NFC in Packaging

10. SUPPLIER AND DEVELOPER PROFILES

  • 10.1. ACREO, Sweden
  • 10.2. BASF, Germany
  • 10.3. Blue Spark Technologies, USA
  • 10.4. Canatu, Finland
  • 10.5. CapXX, Australia
    (More Listed in the Complete Version of the Table of Contents)

11. MARKET FORECASTS 2014-2024

  • 11.1. How printed electronics is being applied
  • 11.2. Surprisingly poor progress with low cost electronics so far
  • 11.3. Ultimate market potential
  • 11.4. E-packaging market 2014-2024
  • 11.5. Beyond brand enhancement
  • 11.6. Printed electronics market
  • 11.7. Battery market for small devices
  • 11.8. Printed electronics needs new design rules
  • 11.9. The emerging value chain is unbalanced
  • APPENDIX 1: GLOSSARY
  • APPENDIX 2: IDTECHEX PUBLICATIONS AND CONSULTANCY

TABLES AND FIGURES


(For a Complete List of Tables and Figures Please Request a Free Sample.)
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