• Japanese
  • Korean
  • Chinese
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NRG Expert Global Smart Grid Report Ed 1, 2011

Abstract

Market Intelligence

In recent years the smart grid has gained a lot of column inches as the panacea for problems with the current electric grid system. A grid system designed for the one-way flow of information and electricity from power plants to consumers. Where consumers are billed for electricity usage based on estimates of consumption regardless that actual usage and according to time of day.

This grid is not designed for the integration of large scale intermittent renewable capacity, or for small-scale distributed renewable capacity such as rooftop solar panels and small scale wind turbines. It also does not penalise electricity usage at peak demand times, which would reduce the need for new build ' peaking' power plants. Therefore there is a demand for a new grid system to meet the demands of the 21st century.

Smart grid deployment has focused on the use of smart meters and associated communications network in most countries with the notable exception of China. Leading players such as Landis+Gyr (now owned by Toshiba) , Elster and Sensus have formed strategic agreements with other players in the smart grid, and to some extent, almost all of the major players are connected through strategic agreements. Furthermore many of these leading smart meter manufacturers produce smart meters for water and gas or other smart products as well as smart electric meters. Demand for smart water meters is expected to be high in countries and regions experiencing water stress such as parts of the Middle East, California etc.

Large companies such as GE and Cisco have entered the space, but no company to date has a fully integrated product. In the US no one player appears to have an early dominance on the local market. This is less of the case overseas, for example in China where GE and IBM are earlier runners in the game. But, as with the renewable sector, China is likely to favour local suppliers and manufacturers working in collaboration with local counterparts. Moreover, like with the renewable sector, Korean and Japanese manufacturers are developing local and overseas projects to gain a foothold on the smart grid market, with is estimated to be worth more than USD100 billion by 2020.

Highlights

A major under looked barrier to smart grid deployment is smart grid security. Studies on the smart meters deployed have found that few have encryption software and can easily be corrupted. Creating a large market for companies involved in the cybersecurity business, notably companies involved in security for the defence sector such as Lockheed Martin and Boeing.

Despite this and other barriers to deployment the installation of smart grids is likely. Not only for the reasons above, but also for the rapid identification of faults in the grid system and rapid repair through the two-way flow of information. Currently power cuts in the grid system take time to repair and are extremely costly for businesses. Therefore, the large costs of implementation of such a system would be outweighed by the long-term cost savings.

Table of Contents

1 Executive Summary

2 Introduction

  • 2.1 Case for the smart grid
  • 2.2 Definition of the smart grid
  • 2.3 The business case of the smart grid

3 Barriers to the development of the smart grid

4 Storage

  • 4.1 Mechanical Storage
  • 4.2 Electrochemical storage
  • 4.3 Electromagnetic storage
  • 4.4 Water heaters
  • 4.5 Coupling to new energies
  • 4.6 Developments

5 Electric Vehicles (EVs)

6 Other smart grid applications

  • 6.1 Water
  • 6.2 Natural gas

7 Standardisation

8 Country drivers

9 Europe

  • 9.1 Austria
  • 9.2 France
  • 9.3 Germany
  • 9.4 Italy
  • 9.5 Netherlands
  • 9.6 Nordic Region (Denmark, Finland, Norway and Sweden)
  • 9.7 Portugal
  • 9.8 Spain
  • 9.9 UK

10 Rest of the World

  • 10.1 Australia
    • 10.1.1 Electric vehicles
    • 10.1.2 Players
  • 10.2 Brazil
    • 10.2.1 Electric vehicles
    • 10.2.2 Players
  • 10.3 Canada
    • 10.3.1 Players
  • 10.4 Chile
  • 10.5 China
    • 10.5.1 Electricity market
    • 10.5.2 State Grid Corporation of China
    • 10.5.3 Electric vehicles
    • 10.5.4 Players
    • 10.5.5 Projects
  • 10.6 Ecuador
    • 10.6.1 Players
  • 10.7 India
    • 10.7.1 Players
  • 10.8 Japan
    • 10.8.1 Electric vehicles
    • 10.8.2 Players
    • 10.8.3 Fujitsu
    • 10.8.4 MegaChips
    • 10.8.5 Toshiba
    • 10.8.6 Utilities
    • 10.8.7 International market
  • 10.9 Korea, South
    • 10.9.1 Projects
    • 10.9.2 International market
    • 10.9.3 Players
  • 10.10 Mexico
  • 10.11 New Zealand
  • 10.12 Russia
    • 10.12.1 Players
  • 10.13 Singapore
  • 10.14 South Africa
  • 10.15 United Arab Emirates (UAE)
    • 10.15.1 Players
  • 10.16 United States of America (USA)
    • 10.16.1 Regional variation
    • 10.16.2 Electric vehicles
    • 10.16.3 Players

11 Investment

12 Costs

13 Security

  • 13.1 Data privacy issues
  • 13.2 Energy Theft
  • 13.3 Malicious intent
  • 13.4 Market size
  • 13.5 Players

14 Players in the smart grid

  • 14.1 Smart Meters
  • 14.2 Online Data Management Tools
    • 14.2.1 Google
    • 14.2.2 Microsoft
  • 14.3 Other players
    • 14.3.1 ABB
    • 14.3.2 Cisco
    • 14.3.3 Comverge
    • 14.3.4 Cooper Power Systems
    • 14.3.5 Current Group
    • 14.3.6 eMeter
    • 14.3.7 EnerNOC
    • 14.3.8 GE
    • 14.3.9 GridPoint
    • 14.3.10 IBM
    • 14.3.11 Oracle
    • 14.3.12 SEL, Schweitzer Engineering Laboratories
    • 14.3.13 Siemens
    • 14.3.14 Silver Springs
    • 14.3.15 SmartSynch

15 Smart metering projects worldwide

List of Figures

  • Figure 2.1. Base, intermediate and peak load by time of day
  • Figure 2.2. Cumulative Hours of Operation
  • Figure 2.3. Traditional and future electric grid systems - Traditional grid (left), future grid (right)
  • Figure 2.4. Meters
  • Figure 2.5. Percentage utility operating savings based on real savings at AMI deployments
  • Figure 4.1. Different grid storage options
  • Figure 4.2. Salt structures and existing gas storage site in Europe
  • Figure 4.3. Projected cost of electric vehicle batteries in the US, 2010 - 2030
  • Figure 5.1. Comparison of different electric power train configurations
  • Figure 5.2. Electric vehicle/ plug-in hybrid electric vehicle roadmap vision for expansion in sales, 2010 - 2050
  • Figure 5.3. Future of the electric car and lithium ion battery markets
  • Figure 6.1. Advanced meter deployments in North America
  • Figure 6.2. Advanced meter deployments in Europe
  • Figure 7.1. Members of the Global Smart Grid Federation, July 2010
  • Figure 9.1. Liberalisation of the electricity market in Europe
  • Figure 9.2. Smart meter deployment by EU member states
  • Figure 9.3. SmartGrids ERA-NET Project - Participating Countries
  • Figure 9.4. The TSO implementation plan
  • Figure 9.5. Identification of priority functional projects, DSO
  • Figure 9.6. European Electricity Grid Initiative estimated programme costs, 2010 - 2019, € million
  • Figure 9.7. SET Roadmap 2010/2020 proposed to the EU
  • Figure 9.8. Medium and low voltage smart grid projects in Europe
  • Figure 9.9. Proposed grid investments in the Nordic region
  • Figure 10.1. Australia' s electricity and gas network companies
  • Figure 10.2. Timeline for the development of the smart grid in Australia at the state level
  • Figure 10.3. Priority areas for the Energy Networks Association in Australia, 2010 - 2012
  • Figure 10.4. Electric vehicle chargers that will be deployed in Victoria, Australia - Changepoint charge station (left), Better Place charge sport
  • (centre), ECOtality residential charger (right)
  • Figure 10.5. Macro-grid vision for Brazil
  • Figure 10.6. Major transmission interconnections between Canada and the US
  • Figure 10.7. Investment in the power sector in China, 2006 - 2009, US $ billions
  • Figure 10.8. China Electricity Load & Resource Centres
  • Figure 10.9. Geographic area covered by the two grid operators in China
  • Figure 10.10. Map of the ten electric power companies in Japan by service area
  • Figure 10.11. National trunk line connections in Japan
  • Figure 10.12. Changing factors around electricity demand and supply in Japan
  • Figure 10.13. CRIEPI roadmap of the next generation grid in Japan
  • Figure 10.14. CRIEPI expectations of different ICT networks required
  • Figure 10.15. Japanese grid of the future
  • Figure 10.16. Planned NEDO microgrids in Albuquerque and Los Alamos, New Mexico - Albuquerque (left), Los Alamos (right)
  • Figure 10.17. Procedures for operations of demand resource spot market in Korea
  • Figure 10.18. Schematic of the proposed DRRC' s standard open ADR (automatic demand response) operating system in Korea
  • Figure 10.19. Development of Korea' s planned real-time demand resource trading system
  • Figure 10.20. Ten power IT projects in Korea
  • Figure 10.21. Timeline for the development of the ten power ICT projects in Korea
  • Figure 10.22. Korean players in the Jeju Island smart grid project
  • Figure 10.23. Korean power network
  • Figure 10.24. Wind capacity in the US as a percentage of total installed power capacity
  • Figure 10.25. RPS policies in the US with solar or distributed provisions, October 2010
  • Figure 10.26. Macro-grid vision for the USA
  • Figure 10.27. Categories of US projects receiving smart grid investment grants, July 2010, US $ million
  • Figure 10.28. Locations of smart grid demonstration and large-scale energy storage projects
  • Figure 10.29. Utility scale smart meter deployments, plans, and proposals in the US, September 2010
  • Figure 10.30. Growth market for smart technology in the US, US $ billion
  • Figure 11.1. Financial new investment by technology, 2009, US $ billion
  • Figure 11.2. Corporate and government R&D investment by technology, 2009, US $ billion
  • Figure 11.3. Smart grid capital spending: 2007 - 2010, US $1.68 billion
  • Figure 11.4. Top ten smart grid federal stimulus investments by country, 2010, US $ million
  • Figure 12.1. Projected average cost of smart grid deployment, US $ million
  • Figure 12.2. Projected development of the smart grid market, 2008 - 2030, US $ billion
  • Figure 12.3. Projected smart grid market size, 2009 - 2014, US $ billion
  • Figure 12.4. Projections for the US and global smart grid market by technology, US $ billion
  • Figure 13.1. Attack points in the smart grid
  • Figure 13.2. Projected size of the smart grid security market by geography, US $ billion
  • Figure 14.1. ' End-to-End' smart grid: leading players by market segment
  • Figure 14.2. Google PowerMeter
  • Figure 14.3. Microsoft Holm partners
  • Figure 14.4. Cisco focus on collection and transmission of power data
  • Figure 14.5. Comverge business model
  • Figure 14.6. Comverge products
  • Figure 14.7. GE communications system
  • Figure 14.8. Gridpoint energy management solutions
  • Figure 14.9. Expected evolution of Orcale smart grid services
  • Figure 14.10. Oracle' s smart grid products
  • Figure 14.11. Schweizer Engineering Laboratories' smart grid solutions
  • Figure 14.12. Silver Springs smart grid solutions
  • Figure 14.13. SmartSynch metering communications services
  • Figure 14.14. SmartSynch partnerships
  • Figure 15.1. Map of smart metering projects in Europe
  • Figure 15.2. Map of smart metering projects in the Middle East
  • Figure 15.3. Map of smart metering projects in the Australasia
  • Figure 15.4. Map of smart metering projects in North America
  • Figure 15.5. Map of smart metering projects in South America
  • Figure 15.6. Map of smart metering projects in Africa

List of Tables

  • Table 2.1. Selected major blackouts
  • Table 2.2. Pricing tariffs for the smart grid
  • Table 2.3. Comparison of Today' s Grid and Smart Grid
  • Table 2.4. Network requirements for smart grid applications
  • Table 2.5. Strengths and weaknesses of different WAN technologies
  • Table 2.6. Overview of IEEE standards
  • Table 2.7. Other technologies promoted by the development of the smart grid market
  • Table 4.1. Main energy storage technologies
  • Table 4.2. Latest prices for energy storage in Great Britain and Germany
  • Table 4.3. Electrochemical Storage Companies
  • Table 5.1. Electric vehicles and their expected launch date onto the US market
  • Table 6.1. Functional capabilities of different types of smart grid technologies
  • Table 7.1. Status of members of the Global Smart Grid Federation, July 2010
  • Table 8.1. Global Smart Grid Development Strategies
  • Table 8.2. Comparison of different smart meter rollouts
  • Table 9.1. Status of the smart grid in different EU countries
  • Table 9.2. Electric and gas metering targets and status in European countries
  • Table 9.3. Founding transmission system and distribution system operators
  • Table 9.4. The TSO/DSO implementation plan
  • Table 9.5. Likely communications technology deployed in different EU countries
  • Table 9.6. Pilot smart grid projects in Austria
  • Table 9.7. Proposed and actual smart grid projects in Germany
  • Table 9.8. Comparative cost of smart meter rollouts
  • Table 9.9. Norwegian smart grid research projects, 2010
  • Table 9.10. Smart grid partnerships in the Nordic region
  • Table 9.11. Funding for smart grid and smart grid-related R&D in the UK
  • Table 10.1. Electricity markets in key Australian states
  • Table 10.2. Australia' s activity in the smart grid compared to Europe, the USA and Ontario, August 2010
  • Table 10.3. Selected charges for customers for smart meters in Victoria, Australia in 2010
  • Table 10.4. Policies and actions to promote the development of the smart grid in Brazil
  • Table 10.5. Brazilian utilities and smart grid projects
  • Table 10.6. Planned and ongoing smart grid activities in Canadian provinces, as of May 2010
  • Table 10.7. Trial Projects in China
  • Table 10.8. State Grid' s planned roll out of the Smart Grid
  • Table 10.9. Promising smart meter players in China
  • Table 10.10.Deployment of smart meters and advanced metering infrastructure (AMI) in China
  • Table 10.11.Key developments in the uptake of broadband-over-power line (BPL) by Ecuadorian utilities
  • Table 10.12.Benefits of smart grids to Indian utilities
  • Table 10.13.Ministry of Power fifteen year smart grid road map
  • Table 10.14.Planned smart grid projects in India
  • Table 10.15.Smart meter contracts awarded in India
  • Table 10.16.Japanese smart grid projects, February 2010
  • Table 10.17.Selected smart grid projects in the pipeline in Japan
  • Table 10.18.Next generation energy system expectations for the Japanese smart grid
  • Table 10.19.Smart grid and smart meter projects planned by Japanese utilities
  • Table 10.20.NEDO' s demonstration projects in New Mexico
  • Table 10.21.National Korean Smart Grid Strategy Road Map
  • Table 10.22.In depth Korean smart grid road map
  • Table 10.23.Five areas of the Jeju test bed
  • Table 10.24.Grid upgrades completed and being planned across New Zealand
  • Table 10.25.Smart meter projects in New Zealand
  • Table 10.26.Smart meter projects in South Africa
  • Table 10.27.Main players in UAE smart grid market
  • Table 10.28.Average cost for one hour of power interruption by industry in the US
  • Table 10.29.Number of blackouts in the US every year
  • Table 10.30.US interconnection projects receiving American Recovery and Reinvestment Act funding, December 2009
  • Table 10.31.Incentives for smart grid projects included in the 2007 EISA
  • Table 10.32.Background on the 100 projects receiving smart grid investment grants from the ARRA
  • Table 10.33.US Cyber Security Projects receiving ARRA funds, 23rd September 2009 143
  • Table 10.34.Utility scale smart meter deployments, plans, and proposals in the US, September 2010
  • Table 10.35.State regulatory framework summary table, July 2010
  • Table 10.36.US regulatory model examples
  • Table 10.37.Milestones for smart grid R&D projects in the US, US Department of Energy
  • Table 10.38.Products part of a US Department of Energy' s vision for the development of the smart grid
  • Table 10.39.Goals to achieve the US Department of Energy smart grid vision
  • Table 10.40.Selected US Utilities with contracts for smart meters in 2010
  • Table 10.41.Selected US Utilities with contracts with other smart grid companies in 2010
  • Table 12.1. Projected progress and estimated costs in smart-grid implementation from 2008 to 2050
  • Table 12.2. Projected average cost of smart grid deployment, US $ million
  • Table 13.1. Selected known security breaches in the power sector
  • Table 13.2. Key text in the California smart grid privacy law
  • Table 13.3. Methods of manipulation of smart meters
  • Table 13.4. Methods and products used for securing critical enterprise networks
  • Table 13.5. Major defence security players in the cyber security market
  • Table 14.1. Key technologies and capabilities enabling smart grid deployment
  • Table 14.2. Main smart meter manufacturers
  • Table 14.3. Main smart grid players
  • Table 14.4. Strategic agreements, partnerships or collaborations between major smart grid players
  • Table 14.5. Google partnerships with utilities and device manufacturers or suppliers
  • Table 14.6. IBM smart grid maturity model
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