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Global Water Deregulation Ed 1 2012

What's in this report?

  • In depth description of the types of water and wastewater privatisation
  • World survey of Water & Wastewater deregulation
  • Coverage of deregulation in the water sector at the country and regional-level

Report Highlights:

Water deregulation - the growth and the backlash

The world's population is averaging a growth rate of around 1.1% annually. This is creating a greater demand for improved water supplies and sanitation, especially in developing countries and urban areas. As stronger population growth is generally observed in these regions. They may also have more challenging requirements to meet the water target under the UN's Millennium Development Goals (MDGs). A target of reducing ‘the proportion of people without sustainable access to safe drinking water and sanitation' for eligible countries by half by 2015.

Private sector

To meet the growing demand for safe water and sanitation private sector involvement will be needed in the water sector has increased. This is in the context of the developing countries. There is also a demand for repair to existing infrastructure and plants, and new facilities in the developed world. Due to the investment involved and expertise needed. The share of private companies in the water and wastewater market is forecast to increase from 8% of the global population in 2003 to 17% in 2015. A problem for the water industry is that water is perceived as a right and citizens are less willing to pay for water than they are for electricity.

Private sector opposition

Opposition to privatisation of the water sector is strong in some countries and the subject is conten-tious. The renationalisation of some assets has occurred with major water companies paying fines failing to comply with their contract, usually in terms of investment in infrastructure. In some countries there are moves to make water privatisation illegal. For example, there is a water privatisation ban in the Netherlands and Uruguay, and a draft law to make water privatisation illegal is under development in Italy. There has been an increase in Public-to-Public Partnerships (PUP) contracts for water projects, and the World Bank is softening its approach towards privatisation. The recent Arab spring also included protests against water privatisation. For example, in Rabat and Tetouan in Morocco there were demonstrations to terminate Veolia's contracts and Veolia's offices in Tanger were set on fire.

Water companies

In many countries, major water companies such as Veolia and Suez are involved in joint ventures to develop projects. Recently, Veolia publically announced that it plans to expand worldwide mostly through build-own-transfer (BOT) and management contracts, with fewer ‘ownership' projects.

Key countries for the water sector in terms of future investments are China and India. A total of RMB 15 billion ($2.2 billion) was spent on sewage treatment facilities in the first half of 2010 in China alone.

Table of Contents

1. Executive Summary

  • Overview

2. Types of Water & Waste Privatisation

  • Why liberalise the water sector?
  • The perception of water
  • PSP - private sector participation models
  • PUPs - Public-public partnerships and ‘twinning' in water and sanitation

3. World survey of Water & Waste Deregulation

  • World survey of water & waste deregulation

4. Europe

  • EU water and waste directives and investment
  • Western Europe
    • Austria
    • Belgium
    • Cyprus
    • France
    • Germany
    • Greece
    • Ireland
    • Italy
    • Luxembourg
    • Malta
    • Netherlands
    • Portugal
    • Spain
    • Switzerland
    • United Kingdom

4. Nordic Countries

  • Overview
    • Denmark
    • Finland
    • Iceland
    • Norway
    • Sweden

5. Central Europe

  • Overview
    • Czech Republic
    • Hungary
    • Poland
    • Slovakia
    • Slovenia

6. The Baltic Countries

  • Overview
    • Estonia
    • Latvia
    • Lithuania

7. Southeast Europe (Balkans)

  • Overview
    • Albania
    • Bosnia Herzegovina
    • Bulgaria
    • Croatia
    • Macedonia
    • Romania
    • Serbia Montenegro
    • Turkey

8. CIS

  • Overview
    • Armenia
    • Azerbaijan
    • Belarus
    • Georgia
    • Kazakhstan
    • Kyrgyzstan
    • Moldova
    • Russia
    • Tajikistan
    • Turkmenistan
    • Ukraine
    • Uzbekistan

9. Southeast Asia

  • Japan
  • Korea, South
  • Macao
  • Taiwan
  • China
  • Hong Kong
  • Cambodia
  • Indonesia
  • Malaysia
  • Myanmar
  • Philippines
  • Singapore
  • Thailand
  • Vietnam

10. Indian Sub-Continent

  • Bangladesh
  • India
  • Nepal
  • Pakistan
  • Sri Lanka

11. Asia Pacific

  • Australia
  • New Zealand

12. North America

  • United States of America
  • Canada

13. South America

  • Overview
    • Argentina
    • Bolivia
    • Brazil
    • Chile
    • Colombia
    • Ecuador
    • Paraguay
    • Peru
    • Uruguay
    • Venezuela

14. Central America and the Caribbean

  • Mexico
  • The Northern Triangle
    • Belize
    • Costa Rica
    • El Salvador
    • Guatemala
    • Honduras
    • Nicaragua
    • Panama
    • Puerto Rico
  • Caribbean
    • Bahamas
    • Barbados
    • Bermuda
    • Cuba
    • Dominican Republic
    • Haiti
    • Jamaica
    • St Lucia
    • Trinidad & Tobago

15. Middle East

  • Bahrain
  • Iran
  • Iraq
  • Israel
  • Jordan
  • Kuwait
  • Lebanon
  • Palestine
  • Qatar
  • Saudi Arabia
  • Syria
  • United Arab Emirates
  • Yemen

16. MENA - Middle East and North Africa - Mahgreb

  • Algeria
  • Egypt
  • Libya
  • Mauritania
  • Morocco
  • Tunisia

17. Sub-Saharan Africa

  • Overview

18. East Africa - Great Lake Region

  • Burundi
  • Dijbouti
  • Ethiopia
  • Kenya
  • Mauritius
  • Rwanda
  • Somalia
  • Sudan
  • Tanzania
  • Uganda

19. Central Africa

  • Cameroon
  • Central African Republic
  • Chad
  • Congo, Republic (Brazzaville)
  • Congo, Democratic Republic (Kinshasa)
  • Gabon
  • Guinea Equatorial

20. West Africa

  • Benin
  • Burkina Faso
  • Cape Verde
  • Cote d'Ivoire
  • Gambia
  • Ghana
  • Guinea
  • Guinea-Bissau
  • Liberia
  • Mali
  • Niger
  • Nigeria
  • Senegal
  • Sierra Leone
  • Togo

21. South African Development Community

  • Overview
  • Angola
  • Botswana
  • Lesotho
  • Madagascar
  • Malawi
  • Mozambique
  • Namibia
  • South Africa
  • Tanzania
  • Zambia
  • Zimbabwe

22. Glossary

Table of Tables

  • Table 2-1: Public-public partnerships (PUPs) in water and sewerage
  • Table 3-1: World Survey of Water and Waste Deregulation
  • Table 4-1: Veolia subsidiaries in water in Europe
  • Table 4-2: Suez subsidiaries in water in Europe
  • Table 4-3: Saur subsidiaries in water in Europe
  • Table 4-4: Gelsenwasser subsidiaries in Europe
  • Table 4-5: Major Italian Aziendi water utilities
  • Table 4-6: Water supply companies in the Netherlands, 2009
  • Table 4-7: UK Water Company ownership
  • Table 4-8: Changes in water ownership in the UK and Ireland, 1970 - 2007
  • Table 5-1: Water concessions companies in the Czech Republic
  • Table 5-2: Concession companies in Hungary
  • Table 9-1: Water supply bodies
  • Table 9-2: Water Supply Plants and Pipelines 2000 - 2005
  • Table 9-3: Construction of Sewage Treatment Plants 2000 - 2005
  • Table 12-1: A Summary of the Law
  • Table 15-1: IWPs and IWPPs plants in Oman
  • Table 15-2: IWPPs in Saudi Arabia
  • Table 15-3: Water production in Abu Dhabi in the UAE, 2011
  • Table 17-1: Access to drinking water in 10 African cities
  • Table 17-2: Market share, earnings and employment in concessionaire and independent water and sanitation providers in Dakar and Bamako
  • Table 17-3: How the sanitation market works in African cities

Table of Figures

  • Figure 1-1: Private sector investments in water and sanitation projects in developing countries, $ million, 1991 to 2010
  • Figure 1-2: Number of private sector investments in water and sanitation projects in developing countries, 1991 to 2010
  • Figure 1-3: PSP Options - A continuum
  • Figure 2-1: PSP Options - A continuum
  • Figure 4-1: Revision of EU Water Policy
  • Figure 4-2: Investment and employment related to EU environmental policy, 1990 - 2010
  • Figure 4-3: Dutch water companies
  • Figure 4-4: UK Water and Sewage companies
  • Figure 4-5: UK Water-only supply companies
  • Figure 12-1: States where American Water Works operates and their market conditions
  • Figure 17-1: Public water service in African cities
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