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Frozen Convenience Foods in the U.S.

Abstract

Marketers of frozen convenience food have found themselves caught between a rock and a hard place during the economic downturn. Though fresh convenience food has gained through positioning that casts it as a less expensive alternative to restaurant food during a time of recession, frozen convenience food is frequently viewed as a more expensive, less fresh alternative to cooking from scratch at home. The frozen food categories that have been able to grow substantially in this environment are therefore the ones that have been able to elude this paradigm.

Specifically, the mammoth frozen pizza category and the spunky hand-held breakfast category have both found a way to go head-to-head with restaurants; and the prepared vegetable category has been able to triumph on the freshness front via the development of steaming techniques. According to Packaged Facts, these three categories have led the way sales-wise, enabling an otherwise ambivalent market for frozen convenience foods to grow by a modest 2.0% in 2010 to reach sales of $16.8 billion. Packaged Facts expects that marketers in other categories will soon adopt similar strategies, driving sales of fresh convenience foods up another 10% by 2015, to $18.6 billion.

Fully updated from the 2007 edition, Frozen Convenience Foods in the U.S. offers a comprehensive look at this complex market in the context of how it competes with the parallel fresh convenience food market, restaurant takeout, and meals prepared from scratch by consumers. It contains in-depth analysis of Internet marketing, including detailed accounts of marketing on social networking sites like Facebook. The report also details the complex changes that have taken place in the market since the previous edition, with new attention to competition by retail sector, including supermarkets, supercenters/mass merchandisers, warehouse clubs, small marts and Internet.

Using SymphonyIRI mass-market sales tracking data, the report offers detailed accounts of sales and marketer/brand activity across nine product categories: Single-Serve Dinners/Entrees, Pizza, Hand-Held Non-Breakfast Entrees, Multi-Serve Dinners/Entrees, Appetizers/Snack Rolls, Hand-Held Breakfast Entrees, Breakfast Entrees, Prepared Vegetables, and Pot Pies. Relying largely on Product Launch Analytics from Datamonitor, the report also examines new product and marketing trends industry-wide. A special feature of this report is custom survey data by Packaged Facts specifically addressing consumer purchasing of frozen prepared foods, including vis-a-vis the down economy, restaurant dining and takeout, and fresh convenience food. Additional demographic, psychographic, and product penetration analysis derives from consumer data compiled by Experian Simmons, New York, NY.

Table of Contents

Chapter 1: Executive Summary

  • Introduction
    • Market Definition: Frozen Convenience Foods
      • SymphonyIRI Product Categories
    • Exclusions
    • Report Methodology
  • Market Size and Composition
    • Retail Sales Will Approach $19 Billion by 2015
    • Figure 1-1: U.S. Retail Sales of Frozen Convenience Foods: 2005, 2010 and 2015 (in millions of dollars)
    • SymphonyIRI-Tracked Sales Virtually Unchanged
    • Supermarkets the No. 1 Retail Channel
  • Competitive Trends
    • Food Conglomerates Dominate
    • Important Niche Marketers
    • Ruiz the Leading Marketer of Mexican-Style Specialties
    • Marketers of Asian and Other International Specialties
    • Amy' s Stands Out Among Natural, Organic, Vegetarian and Gluten-Free Marketers
    • Restaurant Spin-Offs Have Long Frozen Food Tradition
    • Regional Marketers Serve Regional Tastes
    • A Dozen $175 Million Plus Marketers
    • Nestlé, ConAgra and Kraft Control Almost Half the Market
    • Bottom Tier Is Home of Entrepreneurial Niche Marketers
  • Marketing and New Product Trends
    • New Product Launch Rate Slows with Recession
    • A Vast Diversity of New Products
    • Ethnic and Regional Specialties Crossover
  • Consumer Trends
    • Though Time-Pressed, Most Americans Try to Eat Healthier
    • Decline in Restaurant Traffic a Plus for Convenience Groceries
    • 72% of Americans Eat Frozen Prepared Foods
    • Slight Uptick in Demand for Frozen Prepared Food
    • Frozen Prepared Convenience Food Considered a Top Value
    • Figure 1-2: Responses to Question, “Which Prepared Meal Items Provide a Better Value for the Dollar?”: Store-Made Hot, Store-Made Refrigerated, or Packaged Frozen, Fall 2010 (percent of U.S. adults)
    • Retail Purchasing Patterns for Frozen Prepared Meal Items
    • Two-Thirds of Households Use Frozen Pizza

Chapter 2: The Market

  • Introduction
    • Market Definition: Frozen Convenience Foods
      • SymphonyIRI Product Categories
    • Exclusions
    • Report Methodology
    • The Great Recession
  • Market Size and Composition
    • Retail Sales at $16.8 Billion in 2010
    • Table 2-1: U.S. Retail Sales of Frozen Convenience Foods, 2005-2010 (in millions of dollars)
    • SymphonyIRI-Tracked Sales Virtually Unchanged
    • Table 2-2: SymphonyIRI-Tracked Dollar Sales of Frozen Convenience Foods by Category: 52 Weeks Ending July 11, 2010 vs. Year-Ago (in millions of dollars)
    • Single-Serve Dinners/Entrees, Pizza Lead a Three-Tiered Pack
    • Hand-Held Breakfast Entrees and Prepared Vegetable Categories Are Sales Growth Leaders
    • A Tale of Two Markets
    • Table 2-3: SymphonyIRI-Tracked Dollar Sales of Frozen Convenience Food Sales Growth Categories, 52 Weeks Ending July 11, 2010 vs. Year-Ago (in millions of dollars)
    • Table 2-4: SymphonyIRI-Tracked Dollar Sales of Frozen Convenience Food Sales Decline Categories, 52 Weeks Ending July 11, 2010 vs. Year-Ago (in millions of dollars)
    • Shifts in Category Share: Pizza Up/Single-Serve Down
    • Table 2-5: Share of SymphonyIRI-Tracked Dollar Sales of Frozen Convenience Foods by Category, 52 Weeks Ending July 11, 2010 vs. Year-Ago (percent)
    • Supermarkets the No. 1 Retail Channel
    • Table 2-6: Share of U.S. Retail Sales of Frozen Convenience Foods: By Channel, 2007 vs. 2010 (percent)
    • Winter Favors Sales of Frozen Convenience Foods
    • Even Obscure Holidays Can Yield Results
  • Market Outlook
    • Overall Market Dynamics
    • Retail Channels Compete with Each Other and with Foodservice
      • Case in Point: Legal Sea Foods Covers Frozen and Fresh Supermarket, Restaurant and Online Bases
      • The Freshness of Frozen
    • Fine Dining at the Supermarket
    • Illustration 2-1: Carrabba' s Italian Grill in Publix Supermarket, Sarasota, Florida
    • Illustration 2-2: Kroger In-store Bistro, Columbus, Ohio
    • Effects of Recession
    • Taking Dollars Away from Other Markets
    • Fresh Prepared Vegetables Compete on Basis of Technological Advances
    • Illustration 2-3: Birds Eye Frozen Vegetable Steamfresh Technology Web Page
    • Illustration 2-4: “Frozen Food Master” Commenting on Green Giant' s Simply Steamed Frozen Vegetables
    • Frozen Pizza Takes Share from Pizza Chains
      • The Enemy Within
    • Illustration 2-5: Papa Murphy' s Website Banner for Take ‘N' Bake Pizza
    • Hand-Held Breakfast Entrees Taking Hold
    • Frozen Appetizers/Snacks Hold Dual Appeal
    • Convenience Today = Faster
    • Blurring Between Meals and Snacks
    • Tapping into the Global Palate
    • Natural, Organic and Even Vegan Foods Going Mainstream
    • Illustration 2-6: Kashi Mayan Harvest Bake Frozen Meal Packaging (Back)
    • Retail Sales Will Approach $19 Billion by 2015
    • Table 2-7: Projected U.S. Retail Sales of Frozen Convenience Foods, 2010-2015 (in millions of dollars)

Chapter 3: Competitive Overview

  • Food Conglomerates Dominate
  • Important Niche Marketers
  • Ruiz the Leading Marketer of Mexican-Style Specialties
  • Marketers of Asian and Other International Specialties
  • Amy' s Stands Out Among Natural, Organic, Vegetarian and Gluten-Free Marketers
  • Premium vs. Value Positioning
  • Restaurant Spin-Offs Have Long Frozen Food Tradition
  • Regional Marketers Serve Regional Tastes
  • Some Marketers Focus on Non-Supermarket Channels
  • Some Items Retailed in both Frozen and Refrigerated Formats
  • Marketer and Brand Shares
    • A Dozen $175 Million Plus Marketers
    • Nestlé, ConAgra and Kraft Control Almost Half the Market
    • Table 3-1: Top 12 Frozen Convenience Food Marketers and Private Label by SymphonyIRI-Tracked Sales and Market Share, 52 Weeks Ending July 11, 2010 (in millions of dollars)
    • Bottom Tier Is Home of Entrepreneurial Niche Marketers
    • Private Label Has Yet to Fully Capitalize on Recession
    • Table 3-2: SymphonyIRI-Tracked Sales and Market Share of Private Label Frozen Convenience Food by Category: 52 Weeks Ending July 11, 2010 (in millions of dollars)
  • Single-Serve Dinners/Entrees
    • Nestlé Leads Category
    • Natural Food/Gluten-Free Specialist Amy' s Kitchen Comes on Strong
    • Table 3-3: Top Ten Single-Serve Dinners/Entrees Marketers and Their Brands by SymphonyIRI-Tracked Sales and Share: 52 Weeks Ending July 11, 2010 vs. Year-Ago (in millions of dollars)
  • Pizza
    • Kraft Pizza Unit Rolls Over Competition
    • Schwan Finishes a Strong Second
    • Table 3-4: Top Ten Pizza Marketers and Their Brands by SymphonyIRI-Tracked Sales and Share: 52 Weeks Ending July 11, 2010 vs. Year-Ago (in millions of dollars)
  • Hand-Held Non-Breakfast Entrees
    • Nestlé Controls Category Despite Sales Drop
    • Table 3-5: Top Ten Hand-Held on-Breakfast Entree Marketers and Their Brands by SymphonyIRI-Tracked Sales and Share: 52 Weeks Ending July 11, 2010 vs. Year-Ago (in millions of dollars)
  • Multi-Serve Dinners/Entrees
    • Nestlé' s Stouffer' s Dominates
    • Table 3-6: Top Ten Multi-Serve Dinners/Entrees Marketers and Their Brands by SymphonyIRI-Tracked Sales and Share: 52 Weeks Ending July 11, 2010 vs. Year-Ago (in millions of dollars)
  • Appetizers/Snack Rolls
    • General Mills Overtakes Heinz
    • Table 3-7: Top Ten Appetizers/Snack Rolls Marketers and Their Brands by SymphonyIRI-Tracked Sales and Share: 52
    • Weeks Ending July 11, 2010 vs. Year-Ago (in millions of dollars)
  • Breakfast Entrees
    • Jimmy Dean Is Category King
    • Table 3-8: Top Ten Breakfast Entree Marketers and Their Brands by SymphonyIRI-Tracked Sales and Share: 52 Weeks Ending July 11, 2010 vs. Year-Ago (in millions of dollars)
  • Hand-Held Breakfast Entrees
    • Jimmy Dean Also King
    • Table 3-9: Top Ten Hand-Held Breakfast Entrees Marketers and Their Brands by SymphonyIRI-Tracked Sales and Share: 52 Weeks Ending July 11, 2010 vs. Year-Ago (in millions of dollars)
  • Pot Pies
    • Three-Quarters of Sales Belong to ConAgra
    • Table 3-10: Top Pot Pie Breakfast Entrees Marketers and Their Brands by SymphonyIRI-Tracked Sales and Share: 52 Weeks Ending July 11, 2010 vs. Year-Ago (in millions of dollars)
  • Prepared Vegetables
    • Green Giant Towers Over Category
    • Table 3-11: Prepared Vegetable Marketers and Their Brands by SymphonyIRI-Tracked Sales and Share: 52 Weeks Ending July 11, 2010 vs. Year-Ago (in millions of dollars)

Chapter 4: Competitor Profiles

  • Competitor Profile: Nestlé USA, Inc.
    • Company Overview
    • Nestlé Acquisition of Kraft Pizza Unit Consolidates Supremacy
      • 2006 Acquisition of Jenny Craig Gives Nestlé an Advantage in Unmonitored Outlets as Well
    • Stouffer' s and Stouffer' s Lean Cuisine
    • Corner Bistro Competes with Hot Pockets and Restaurants
      • Stouffer' s Dinner Club Stretches Consumer Wallets While Compiling Data
    • Illustration 4-1: Stouffer' s Dinner Club Banner Link from NestléUSA.com Website
    • Illustration 4-2: Stouffer' s Dinner Club Banner Link from the Stouffers.com Website
      • Easy Express Skillets Are Sizzling
    • Illustration 4-3: Stouffer' s Easy Express Skillet Cheesy Meatball Rigatoni
    • Hot Pockets on the Web
    • Illustration 4-4: Wall Posting Dialog from Hot Pocket' s Facebook Page
    • Hot Pockets Deal with Major League Gaming
      • Mixing Gaming and Facebook
    • Illustration 4-5: Facebook Comments on Hot Pockets National Gaming Day
      • Hot Pockets: Just Another Facebook Buddy
    • Illustration 4-6: Hot Pockets Facebook Fan Photo Posting and Comments (Sept. 2010)
      • Hot Pockets Online Satire Is No Laughing Matter
  • Competitor Profile: Kraft Foods, Inc.
    • Corporate Background
      • Goodbye Pizza, Hello Cadbury
    • South Beach Diet Brand Leaves Frozen Field
    • Illustration 4-7: Kraft South Beach Products
    • DiGiorno Is the Jewel in the Pizza Crown
    • Recession Aids DiGiorno' s Fight with Pizza Chains
      • Advertising Makes Targeting of Pizza Chains Crystal Clear
    • California Pizza Kitchen: Suffering from Neglect, or the Recession?
    • Jack' s Pizza Virtually Unchanged
      • Tombstone Pizza Knows How to Work Facebook
  • Competitor Profile: ConAgra Foods, Inc
    • Corporate Background
      • No. 2 in Frozen Convenience Foods
    • ConAgra Recasts Healthy Choice, Again
      • Marie Callender' s: Still Cooking Away
    • Banquet Reformulates and Holds Line with $1 Price Point
    • Youngsters Bug Out on Kid Cuisine
  • Competitor Profile: The Schwan Food Company
    • Corporate Background
    • Illustration 4-8: Schwan' s Home Delivery Truck
    • Pizza Is Schwan' s Cash Cow
    • Red Baron: New Products and Hockey Mom Recognition
      • Red Baron Squadron Shot Down
    • Illustration 4-9: The Red Baron Pizza Squadron in Flight
    • Schwan' s Yellow Trucks Go Green
    • Schwan' s Asian Flagship Is Asian Sensations
  • Competitor Profile: General Mills
    • Corporate Background
      • General Mills' Mission Statement Reflects Convenience Food
    • Totino' s Is General Mills' Largest Frozen Convenience Food Brand
      • The Box Tops Program
    • Illustration 4-10: Totino' s Double Box Tops Program “Get Involved” Website Banner
    • Child Spokespersons Reinforce “Kid' s Most Favorite Thing” Positioning
    • Illustration 4-11: Totino' s “Kid' s Most Favorite Thing” Television Spot (Screenshot)
      • Totino' s: An Adult-Free Zone
    • Green Giant Controls Prepared Vegetables Category
      • Award-Winning Technology Gives Green Giant' s Fresh Steamers an Edge
      • Just For One Line Courts Weight Watchers Consumers
      • Birds Eye Coming on Strong

Chapter 5: Marketing, New Product, and Retail Trends

  • Marketing and New Product Trends
    • New Product Launch Rate Slows with Recession
    • Table 5-1: Number of U.S. Frozen Convenience Food Product Introductions, 2007-2010
    • Table 5-2: Number of U.S. Frozen Convenience Food Product Introductions: By Category, 2007-2010
    • A Vast Diversity of New Products
    • Ethnic and Regional Specialties Crossover
    • Table 5-3: Frozen Convenience Food Products Introduced Between October 1, 2009 and October 1, 2010: Brand, Product, and Number of SKUs
    • The Top Package Tag/Label Claim: Quick
    • Table 5-4: Top 20 Frozen Convenience Food Introductions by Number of Package Tags/Claims, 2007-2010 (Year-End October 1)
    • Restaurant Quality at Home
      • Stouffer' s Seeking Restaurant Mojo in Corner Bistro
      • The Power of Packaging
    • Light Saucing
    • Packaging Form Versus Function/Cooking Process
    • Marketing Gourmet/Superpremium During a Recession
      • Cheaper Than Restaurant Fare
      • General Mills & Unilever' s Chinese Takeout Menus
      • General Mills Italian Restaurant Offering
      • Targeting Consumers and Foodservice
    • Natural and Organic Options Continue to Proliferate
    • Table 5-5: U.S. Organic Food vs. Total Food Sales Growth and Penetration 2000-2009 (in millions)
    • Table 5-6: Companies That Introduced Organic and/or Natural Frozen Convenience Products, October 2009-October 2010
      • Packaged Prepared Foods Account for 14% of Organic Market
    • Figure 5-1: U.S. Organic Food Sales by Product Type, 2009 (percent)
    • Gluten-Free Frozen Convenience Foods
      • What Is Gluten?
      • Why a Gluten-Free Diet?
      • Medical Opinion vs. Consumer Opinion
      • Amy' s Leads the Pack in Therapeutic Foods and Info
    • Illustration 5-1: “Special Diets” Page from Amy' s Website
      • Amy' s Interactive Marketing Strategy
      • Gluten-Free Frozen Convenience Food Takes on Healthy Halo
    • Pizza: Thin Crust Is Hot
    • Michelina' s Green Marketing
    • The Local Foods Movement
      • Informal Focus Group Reflects Packaged Facts' 7 Aspects of Local Food Appeal
      • Local Action in Frozen Convenience Foods
    • Major Frozen Convenience Food Marketers Including Nestlé Embrace Low Sodium Trend
  • Retail Trends
  • Introduction
    • Retail Distribution Methods
      • Direct Delivery Advantages
      • The Cost of Face-to-Face Business
      • Advantages of Warehouse Delivery
      • Smaller Marketers Work Through Brokers
    • Frozen Convenience Food Also Shipped Direct to Consumers
    • Trade Shows Introduce New Products to Market
    • Types of Retail Channels
    • Channel Blurring
    • Focus on Supermarkets
      • Natural/Organic Frozen Convenience Food Presents Placement Challenge
      • Giant Eagle Takes Flexible Approach
    • Focus on Small Marts: Fresh and Not So Easy
    • Focus on Health & Natural Food Stores: Retailers Moving Mainstream
    • Focus on Supercenters/Mass Merchandisers, and Warehouse Clubs
      • Warehouse Clubs: A Party of Three
      • Frozen Convenience Foods a Key to BJ' s Recent Success
      • Warehouse Clubs Have Tradition of Alternative Frozen Convenience Food
    • Focus on Vending: Downsized Workforce Halts Growth
      • Vending Machines Benefit from Brand Recognition
    • E-tailers and Mail Order
      • Specialty E-tailers Have Advantages Over Brick-and-Mortar
    • Table 5-7: Celiac Links & Gluten-Free Frozen Convenience Food Bestsellers from Gluten Free Mall.com
      • Diet Centers Are Also E-tailers

Chapter 6: Consumer Trends

  • Introduction
    • Methodology
    • Though Time-Pressed, Most Americans Try to Eat Healthier
    • Figure 6-1: Consumer Attitudes About Healthy Foods and Time Constraints, Spring 2010 (percent of U.S. adults)
    • Decline in Restaurant Traffic a Plus for Convenience Groceries
    • Figure 6-2: Consumer Usage of Restaurants vs. Cooking at Home, Summer 2010 (percent of U.S. adults)
    • Table 6-1: Level of Agreement with Statement, “I Am Spending Less on Groceries These Days Because of the Economy,” Summer 2010 (percent of U.S. adults)
    • NGA Survey Confirms Shift from Restaurants to Groceries
    • Opportunities Remain to Make Gains at Expense of Restaurants
    • Table 6-2: Responses to Question, “In Comparison to Right Now, How Much Money Do You Plan to Spend on Meals Eaten at Full-Service Restaurants During the Following 3 Months?” Summer 2010 (percent of U.S. adults)
    • Table 6-3: Responses to Question, “In Comparison to Right Now, How Much Money Do You Plan to Spend on Meals Eaten at Fast-Food Restaurants During the Following 3 Months?” Summer 2010 (percent of U.S. adults)
    • Table 6-4: Responses to Question, “In Comparison to Right Now, How Much Money Do You Plan to Spend on Takeout/Delivery/Drive-Thru Meals Eaten at Full-Service Restaurants During the Following 3 Months?” Summer 2010 (percent of U.S. adults)
    • 72% of Americans Eat Frozen Prepared Foods
    • Figure 6-3: Responses To Question, “Have You Used Any Store-Made Hot Prepared Meal Items In The Last 3 Months?” Fall 2010 (percent of U.S. adults)
    • Figure 6-4: Responses To Question, “Have You Used Any Store-Made Refrigerated Prepared Meal Items In The Last 3 Months?” Fall 2010 (percent of U.S. adults)
    • Figure 6-5: Responses To Question, “Have You Used Any Packaged Frozen (Not Store-Made) Prepared Meal Items In The Last 3 Months?”Fall 2010 (percent of U.S. adults)
    • Slight Uptick in Demand for Frozen Prepared Food
    • Figure 6-6: Responses to Question, “Since The Recession Began, Has The Amount of Packaged Frozen Prepared Meal Items That You Use Decreased, Stayed About the Same, or Increased?” Fall 2010 (percent of U.S. adults)
    • Consumers Who Are Eating More Frozen Food: What Are They Eating Less Of?
    • Figure 6-7: Responses to Question, “Given That You Are Eating More Packaged Frozen Prepared Meal Items, Are You Doing Any Of The Following?” Fall 2010 (percent of U.S. adults)
    • Taste of Store-Prepared Hot Food Preferred Over Frozen
    • Figure 6-8: Responses to Question, “Which Prepared Meal Items Taste Better?”: Store-Made Hot, Store-Made Refrigerated, or Packaged Frozen Fall 2010 (percent of U.S. adults)
    • Frozen Prepared Convenience Food Considered a Top Value
    • Figure 6-9: Responses to Question, “Which Prepared Meal Items Provide a Better Value for the Dollar?”: Store-Made Hot, Store-Made Refrigerated, or Packaged Frozen, Fall 2010 (percent of U.S. adults)
    • From The I Hate to Cook Book to Sandra Lee
    • How Many Consumers Are Mixing and Matching?
    • Table 6-5: Percent of Adults Who Have Eaten a Meal Composed Solely or Composed Partially of Store-Bought Frozen Prepared Food Items in the Last 3 Months: By Daypart Fall 2010 (percent of U.S. adults)
    • Retail Purchasing Patterns for Frozen Prepared Meal Items
    • Table 6-6: Where Have You Purchased Packaged Frozen Prepared Meal Items In The Past 3 Months? (percent of U.S. adults)
    • What Percent of Consumers Often Eat Frozen Dinners?
    • Table 6-7: Levels of Agreement/Disagreement with Statement, “I Often Eat Frozen Dinners,” 2009/10 (percent of U.S. adults)
    • Downscale Singles Are Heavy Consumers of Frozen Dinners
    • Table 6-8: Above-Average Demographics for Agreement with Statement: “I Often Eat Frozen Dinners,” 2009/10 (index among U.S. adults)
    • Table 6-9: Below-Average Demographics for Agreement with Statement: “I Often Eat Frozen Dinners,” 2009/10 (index of U.S. adults)
    • Attitudes on Nutritional Value of Frozen Dinners
    • Table 6-10: Levels of Agreement/Disagreement with Statement, “Frozen Dinners Have Little Nutritional Value,” 2009/10 (percent of U.S. adults)
    • Table 6-11: Above-Average Demographics for Disagreement with Statement: “Frozen Dinners Have Little Nutritional Value,” 2009/10 (index among U.S. adults)
    • Table 6-12: Above-Average Demographics for Agreement with Statement: “Frozen Dinners Have Little Nutritional Value,” 2009/10 (index among U.S. adults)
    • Two-Thirds of Households Use Frozen Pizza
    • Table 6-13: Usage Levels for Frozen Pizzas, 2007/08 through 2009/10 (percent of U.S. households)
    • Table 6-14: Usage Levels for Top Pizza Brands, 2007/08 through 2009/10 (percent of U.S. households)
    • Over Half of Households Buy Frozen Dinners Regularly
    • Table 6-15: Usage Levels for Frozen Complete Dinners, 2007/08 through 2009/10 (percent of U.S. households)
    • Table 6-16: Usage Levels for Top Frozen Dinner Brands, 2007/08 through 2009/10 (percent of U.S. households)
    • Table 6-17: Usage Levels for Top Frozen Dinner Brands, 2007/08 through 2009/10 (percent of U.S. households)
    • 46% of Households Use Frozen Hot Snacks
    • Table 6-18: Usage Levels for Frozen Hot Snacks, 2007/08 through 2009/10 (percent of U.S. households)
    • Table 6-19: Usage Levels for Top Frozen Hot Snack Brands, 2007/08 through 2009/10 (percent of U.S. households)
    • One-Fourth of Households Use Frozen Breakfast Entrees/Sandwiches
    • Table 6-20: Usage Levels for Frozen Breakfast Entrees/Sandwiches, 2007/08 through 2009/10 (percent of U.S. households)
    • Table 6-21: Usage Levels for Top Frozen Breakfast Entree/Sandwich Brand Lines, 2007/08 through 2009/10 (percent of U.S. households)
    • Motivations for Buying Ready-to-Eat and/or Heat-and-Eat Food from Food Stores or Convenience Stores
    • Table 6-22: Reasons for Getting Ready-to-Eat and/or Heatand-Eat Food from a Grocery Store/Supermarket, 2009 (percent)
    • Table 6-23: Reasons for Getting Ready-to-Eat and/or Heatand-Eat Food from a Convenience Store/Gas Station, 2009 (percent)
    • Wegmans' Survey Shows Customers Want Easy, Healthy and Affordable Meals

Appendix: Addresses of Selected Marketers and Retailers

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