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Overcoming Opposition to 5G Deployment: Corporate and Community Strategies to Drive Implementation with Technology Assessment and Market Outlook

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Overcoming Opposition to 5G Deployment: Corporate and Community Strategies to Drive Implementation with Technology Assessment and Market Outlook
Published: February 27, 2019 Content info:
Description

Despite the many anticipated communications benefits of fifth generation (5G) cellular, a very vocal minority of municipalities and local leaders are opposed to 5G deployment for reasons ranging from aesthetics and health concerns to local government rights and corporate overreach. 5G pundits include the wireless carrier ecosystem as well as independent consultants espousing primarily the economic benefits of 5G capabilities including new feature functionality enabled by substantially greater bandwidth and much lower latency.

Many misconceptions and unanswered questions remain roadblocks for municipal acceptance of 5G. Furthermore, some local governments have concerns over aggressive timelines postulated for 5G deployment. A general lack of acceptance exists with a very vocal minority while the majority of the public is not engaged, which does not necessarily equate to disinterest but rather lack of community involvement. However, certain municipalities, such as Marin County, California have brought together enough support to change the course of 5G deployment plans, which otherwise would have proceeded without dealing with public concerns. The California county successfully took a stand with other public agencies against a federal ruling for 5G deployment.

The local government have engaged in a communications and information sharing initiative. They have conducted community surveys with instructive findings such as 52 percent of respondents expressing at least moderate concern about the upgrades to wireless communication devices and exposure to electromagnetic fields. They also developed a webpage to provide useful information to the public such as "...5G antennas are generally smaller in size (each antenna equivalent to the size of a tool cabinet) and have a more limited coverage area of less than 1,000 feet, meaning they are most effective where there is a line of sight between the antenna and the user or another antenna".

Marin has also stated some of their concerns very clearly on the webpage including "The FCC's actions placed new limits on state and local government's regulatory authority over small wireless infrastructure located within the public rights of way, established limits on the amount of fees that can be charged for use of publicly owned utility poles for the installation of telecommunications equipment (such as antennae) as well as the amount of fees that can be charged for the review of telecommunications facilities". In January 2019, the county conducted a workshop with the intention to discuss the emerging issues associated with a federal ruling and provide direction to staff about potential amendments to the County's policies and regulations.

In a more rural county in the state of Washington, Clallam County, a Planning Commission has held public meetings. In a recent meeting, one hundred percent of speakers from the public voiced concerns about 5G with most associated with health-related uses due to concern about millimeter wave (mmWave) RF signals. Health officials indicated concern over how mmWave could disrupt cells within the body. Some voice concerns about mmWave being used as a tool for crowd control by the government, underscoring public misunderstanding about high-power microwave vs. low-power cellular signals.

This report will help the reader better understand the issues and identify strategies for collaboration between the wireless carrier ecosystem and local leaders. The report will enable the reader to develop effective strategies for engagement to gain support for 5G deployment and operations. This includes engaging municipalities and civic leaders about 5G economic and quality of life benefits. Additional insights from our primary research along with recommendations are found in the report. The report is intended for both sides of the issue as both local leaders and corporate interests will use it to better engage the other party. The report will also help the reader better understand 5G technology and capabilities.

This Management Strategy Report is part of our Insight Series that identifies developing market trends and provides vision into the market impact of emerging and disintermediating technologies. This offering includes expert Q&A as well as one hour of interactive consultation to answer your pressing technology and/or business issues. Additional consulting, advisory services, and/or research customization are available upon request.

Select Findings:

  • Substantial misconception about what 5G is and is not
  • Critically important to address citizen 5G health related concerns
  • Lack of knowledge about quality of life benefits of 5G apps and services
  • Key need for collaboration between corporate and community interests

Report Benefits:

  • Understand 5G concerns of citizens and local government
  • Identify opportunities for collaboration between carrier ecosystem and municipalities
  • Develop strategies for how to better engage local government and community leaders
  • Identify how to engender citizen support for 5G based on quality of life apps and services
  • Proactively address concerns about federal overreach into municipality rights to self-govern

Target Audience:

  • Wireless carriers
  • Urban planning groups
  • Smart city infrastructure providers
  • Municipal planning boards and committees
  • Local civic leaders and evangelists
  • Concerned healthcare practitioners
  • Concerned environmentalists

Companies in Report:

  • AT&T
  • Crown Castle
  • Ericsson
  • Intel
  • Nokia
  • Qualcomm
  • Sprint
  • T-Mobile
  • Verizon
Table of Contents

Table of Contents

1. Executive Summary

2. Introduction

  • 2.1. Missteps by FCC/Carriers towards Municipalities
  • 2.2. Opposition to 5G Deployment
  • 2.3. Trillion Dollar Industry in Jeopardy
  • 2.4. Areas of Confusion, Concern, and Opportunities

3. 5G Areas of Public Confusion

  • 3.1. High Power vs. Low Power mmWave
  • 3.2. Shared Infrastructure and Dynamic Spectrum Sharing
  • 3.3. Cellular Radio is NOT Ionizing Radiation
  • 3.4. RF Propagation: Attenuation (Blocking and Fading)

4. 5G Areas of Public Concern

  • 4.1. Perceived Health Dangers of Cellular Radiation
  • 4.2. Number and Location of Small Cells
  • 4.3. Ability to Camouflage 5G Cells
  • 4.4. Heavy-handedness against Local Government Authority

5. Case Studies

  • 5.1. Marin County, California
  • 5.2. Clallam Country, Washington

6. 5G Areas of Opportunity

  • 6.1. A Need for Collaboration with Municipalities
  • 6.2. Balancing Economic Growth with Concerns
  • 6.3. 5G Implications Requires More Hands-on Approach
  • 6.4. Corporate Strategy Should Include Community Involvement
  • 6.5. Helping Local Leaders Understand Local Benefits
  • 6.6. Local Use Cases Focused on Quality of Life Benefits
  • 6.7. Micro Business Cases Focused on Local Economy

7. 5G Market Analysis and Forecasts

  • 7.1. Overly Aggressive Forecasts in Light of Issues
  • 7.2. Recommended Apps and Services for Early Adoption

8. Summary and Recommendations

  • 8.1. Smart Cities have Smart People with Concerns
  • 8.2. Recommendations
  • 8.3. Balance Tops Down Corporate with Bottoms Up Community
  • 8.4. Develop Proof Points with Key Communities and Leaders
  • 8.5. Focus on Quality of Life Apps and Services

5G Technology Development and Market Deployment

1.0 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

2.0 INTRODUCTION TO 5G TECHNOLOGY

  • 2.1 5G TECHNOLOGY AND FUNCTIONALITY
    • 2.1.1 DIFFERENCES BETWEEN 5G AND 4G
  • 2.2 WHAT 5G TECHNOLOGY CAN OFFER?
  • 2.3 OSI LAYERS IN 5G
    • 2.3.1 PHYSICAL AND MEDIUM ACCESS CONTROL LAYER
    • 2.3.2 NETWORK LAYER
    • 2.3.3 OPEN TRANSPORT PROTOCOL (OTA) LAYER
    • 2.3.4 APPLICATION LAYER
  • 2.4 5G MOTIVATION AND TIMELINE
  • 2.5 5G SPECTRUM OPTIONS AND UTILIZATION
  • 2.6 ELEMENTS OF 5G
  • 2.7 5G CHALLENGES
    • 2.7.1 TECHNOLOGY REQUIREMENTS AND SERVICE CHARACTERISTICS
    • 2.7.2 STANDARDIZATION
    • 2.7.3 NETWORK CHALLENGES
    • 2.7.4 MOBILE DEVICE CHALLENGES
    • 2.7.5 APPLICATION CHALLENGES
  • 2.8 TECHNOLOGICAL REQUIREMENTS OF 5G

3.0 5G ENABLING TECHNOLOGIES

  • 3.1 MASSIVE MIMO
  • 3.2 NETWORK FUNCTIONS VIRTUALIZATION (NFV)
  • 3.3 SDN AND VIRTUALIZATION
  • 3.4 COGNITIVE RADIOS (CRS) AND TRANSMISSION TECHNOLOGIES
  • 3.5 SELF-ORGANIZING NETWORKS (SONS)
  • 3.6 COMMUNICATION, NAVIGATION, SENSING AND SERVICES
  • 3.7 COOPERATIVE COMMUNICATION FUNCTIONS
    • 3.7.1 MULTI-HOP
    • 3.7.2 CACHING
  • 3.8 AUTOMATED NETWORK ORGANIZATION
    • 3.8.1 SELF-CONFIGURATION
    • 3.8.2 AUTOMATIC NEIGHBOUR RELATION (ANR)
    • 3.8.3 SELF-HEALING
    • 3.8.4 SELF-ORGANIZATION
  • 3.9 ADVANCED TRAFFIC MANAGEMENT
  • 3.10 VISIBLE LIGHT COMMUNICATIONS (VLCS)
  • 3.11 ENERGY EFFICIENCY
  • 3.12 MILLIMETER WAVE (MMWAVE)
  • 3.13 MASSIVE M2M COMMUNICATIONS
  • 3.14 C-RAN ARCHITECTURE
  • 3.15 HETNET SOLUTION
  • 3.16 H-CRAN SOLUTION
  • 3.17 LARGE-SCALE COOPERATIVE SPATIAL SIGNAL PROCESSING (LS-CSSP)
  • 3.18 SDR
  • 3.19 SPECTRUM AND SATELLITE
  • 3.20 DRONES, ROBOTS, AND HIGH-ALTITUDE BALLOONS
  • 3.21 NEXT GEN TECHNOLOGY
    • 3.21.1 CROSS LAYER CONTROLLER
    • 3.21.2 ENERGY AWARE
    • 3.21.3 SECURITY

4.0 5G REGULATORY CONTRIBUTOR

  • 4.1 5G ROADMAP
    • 4.1.1 5G REQUIREMENTS
    • 4.1.2 5G WIRELESS SUBSYSTEM
    • 4.1.3 NETWORK VIRTUALISATION & SOFTWARE NETWORKS
    • 4.1.4 CONVERGED CONNECTIVITY
  • 4.2 GSMA
  • 4.3 OFCOM UK
  • 4.4 METIS
  • 4.5 5G PPP
  • 4.6 NGMN
  • 4.7 4G AMERICAS

5.0 5G SERVICE APPLICATIONS IN M2M AND IOT ENVIRONMENT

  • 5.1 5G BUSINESS CASE
    • 5.1.1 SHARING SPECTRUM AND SERVICE SPECTRUM
  • 5.2 POTENTIAL 5G APPLICATION USE CASES
    • 5.2.1 VIRTUAL REALITY OR TACTILE INTERNET
    • 5.2.2 AUTONOMOUS DRIVING AND CONNECTED CARS
    • 5.2.3 WIRELESS CLOUD-BASED OFFICE AND MULTI-PERSON VIDEOCONFERENCING
    • 5.2.4 M2M CONNECTIVITY
    • 5.2.5 50+ MBPS EVERYWHERE
    • 5.2.6 HIGH SPEED TRAIN
    • 5.2.7 REMOTE COMPUTING
    • 5.2.8 NON-STATIONARY HOT SPOTS
    • 5.2.9 3D CONNECTIVITY: AIRCRAFT
    • 5.2.10 SMART CLOTHING
    • 5.2.11 SENSOR NETWORKS
    • 5.2.12 NATURAL DISASTER
    • 5.2.13 CONTROL NETWORK FOR ROBOTS
    • 5.2.14 EHEALTH
    • 5.2.15 3D CONNECTIVITY: DRONES
    • 5.2.16 PUBLIC SAFETY
    • 5.2.17 CONTEXT AWARE SERVICE
  • 5.3 BRAND NEW SERVICES CAPABILITY

6.0 5G ECOSYSTEM

  • 6.1 5G REQUIREMENT
    • 6.1.1 USER DRIVEN REQUIREMENT
    • 6.1.2 NETWORK DRIVEN REQUIREMENT
  • 6.2 STAKEHOLDER ANALYSIS
  • 6.3 STAKEHOLDER EXPECTATION: KPI'S OF 5G TECHNOLOGY
    • 6.3.1 PERFORMANCE CHALLENGES
    • 6.3.2 SYSTEM LEVEL CHALLENGES
  • 6.4 5G CHANNEL MODEL
  • 6.5 APIS AND SLAS TO EXTERNAL ACTORS
  • 6.6 KEY DRIVERS
  • 6.7 DISRUPTIVE CAPABILITIES
  • 6.8 DESIGN PRINCIPLES
  • 6.9 5G BUSINESS MODEL
  • 6.10 5G VALUE PROPOSITION

7.0 5G STANDARDIZATION AND RESEARCH

  • 7.1 MAJOR EVENT
  • 7.2 RESEARCH, DEVELOPMENT AND INNOVATION
  • 7.3 STANDARDIZATION ACTIVITIES
  • 7.4 ITU RADIO COMMUNICATION SECTOR (ITU-R)
  • 7.5 3GPP
    • 7.5.1 IMT 2020
    • 7.5.2 RAN STUDY
  • 7.6 GSMA
  • 7.7 NGMN ALLIANCE
  • 7.8 TIA
  • 7.9 EUROPEAN COMMISSION (EC)
    • 7.9.1 METIS
    • 7.9.2 5G PPP
    • 7.9.3 5G PPP PROJECTS
    • 7.9.4 5GNOW
  • 7.10 NATIONAL GOVERNMENTS IN EASTERN ASIA
    • 7.10.1 CHINA IMT-2020
    • 7.10.2 JAPAN ARIB 20B AH
    • 7.10.3 KOREA 5G FORUM
    • 7.10.4 CHINA'S 5G PROJECT
  • 7.11 MOBILE OPERATOR AND VENDORS
    • 7.11.1 SK TELECOM AND ERICSSON
    • 7.11.2 HUAWEI AND SAMSUNG
    • 7.11.3 NTT DOCOMO AND MULTIPLE VENDORS
    • 7.11.4 TURKCELL AND ERICSSON
    • 7.11.5 5G NORMA (NOKIA AND SK TELECOM)
    • 7.11.6 HUAWEI AND ERICSSON
  • 7.12 FANTASTIC-5G
  • 7.13 5GIC
  • 7.14 NYU WIRELESS

8.0 5G VENDORS AND COMPANY ANALYSIS

  • 8.1 ERICSSON
    • 8.1.1 5G COLLABORATION AND COMMITMENT
    • 8.1.2 5G STRATEGY AND USE CASES
    • 8.1.3 5G TRIAL COMMITMENT
  • 8.2 ALCATEL-LUCENT
    • 8.2.1 5G RESEARCH AND CONTRIBUTIONS
    • 8.2.2 5G STRATEGY
    • 8.2.3 5G SOLUTIONS
  • 8.3 FUJITSU
    • 8.3.1 5G STRATEGY AND SOLUTIONS
    • 8.3.2 5G CONTRIBUTION
    • 8.3.3 5G TRIAL COMMITMENT
  • 8.4 HUAWEI
    • 8.4.1 5G VISION
    • 8.4.2 5G STRATEGY
    • 8.4.3 5G COLLABORATION AND CONTRIBUTION
  • 8.5 INTEL
    • 8.5.1 5G STRATEGY
    • 8.5.2 5G COLLABORATION AND CONTRIBUTION
  • 8.6 NEC
    • 8.6.1 5G STRATEGY
    • 8.6.2 5G CONTRIBUTION
    • 8.6.3 5G TRIAL COMMITMENT
  • 8.7 SAMSUNG
    • 8.7.1 5G STRATEGY AND VISION
    • 8.7.2 5G CONTRIBUTION
    • 8.7.3 5G COLLABORATION
    • 8.7.4 5G TRIAL COMMITMENT
  • 8.8 ZTE
    • 8.8.1 5G STRATEGY
    • 8.8.2 5G CONTRIBUTION
    • 8.8.3 5G TRIAL COMMITMENT
  • 8.9 QUALCOMM
    • 8.9.1 5G STRATEGY
    • 8.9.2 5G CONTRIBUTION
  • 8.10 NOKIA NETWORKS
    • 8.10.1 5G VISION
    • 8.10.2 5G STRATEGY
    • 8.10.3 5G CONTRIBUTION AND COLLABORATION
    • 8.10.4 5G TRIAL COMMITMENT
  • 8.11 CHINA MOBILE
    • 8.11.1 5G CONTRIBUTION
  • 8.12 DEUTSCHE TELEKOM
    • 8.12.1 5G CONTRIBUTION
  • 8.13 NTT DOCOMO
    • 8.13.1 5G CONTRIBUTION
  • 8.14 SK TELECOM
    • 8.14.1 5G CONTRIBUTION
  • 8.15 BROADCOM
    • 8.15.1 5G CONTRIBUTION
  • 8.16 LG U+
  • 8.17 SINGTEL

9.0 5G INVESTMENT AND SUBSCRIPTION FORECAST

  • 9.1 GLOBAL 5G R&D AND TRIAL INVESTMENTS
    • 9.1.1 5G INVESTMENT BY CATEGORY
  • 9.2 LTE ADVANCE AND 5G SUBSCRIPTION 2019 - 2030
  • 9.3 5G ONLY SUBSCRIPTION 2019 - 2030
    • 9.3.1 5G ONLY SUBSCRIPTIONS BY REGIONS 2019 - 2030
  • 9.4 MOBILE OPERATORS' 5G EXPECTATION
    • 9.4.1 NETWORK LEVEL EXPECTATION
    • 9.4.2 SPECTRUM USAGE EXPECTATION
    • 9.4.3 SERVICE LEVEL EXPECTATION
    • 9.4.4 5G DEVELOPMENT BY REGIONS
    • 9.4.5 5G COMMERCIAL LAUNCHING
  • 9.5 DATA TRAFFIC, VIDEO, AND DOWNLOAD SPEED PROJECTION 2020 - 2030
  • 9.6 5G INVESTMENT CASE ANALYSIS
    • 9.6.1 EUROPEAN COMMISSION
    • 9.6.2 HUAWEI
    • 9.6.3 SOUTH KOREA
    • 9.6.4 ZTE
    • 9.6.5 HORIZON 2020
  • 9.7 QUANTUM TECHNOLOGY AND 6G INVESTMENT ANALYSIS

10.0 5G IMPLICATION FOR TELECOM INDUSTRY

  • 10.1 SPECTRUM AND COVERAGE IMPLICATIONS
  • 10.2 ONE MILLISECOND LATENCY
  • 10.3 BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES

11.0 CONCLUSIONS AND RECOMMENDATIONS

  • 11.1 END-TO-END ECOSYSTEM
  • 11.2 5G CONSIDERATIONS
    • 11.2.1 5G ARRIVAL DEPENDS ON SPECIFICATIONS AND ADOPTION
    • 11.2.2 NEW RAN WILL IMPROVE MOBILE NETWORKS
    • 11.2.3 IMMEDIATE TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS
    • 11.2.4 LTE MAY SLOW DOWN 5G GROWTH
    • 11.2.5 USE OF GOVERNMENTAL INTEREST AND RESOURCES
    • 11.2.6 MORE SUSTAINABLE OPERATOR INVESTMENT MODEL IN TERMS OF CAPACITY
  • 11.3 5G VALUE CREATION
    • 11.3.1 FOR CONSUMERS
    • 11.3.2 FOR ENTERPRISES
    • 11.3.3 FOR VERTICALS
    • 11.3.4 FOR 3RD PARTY PARTNERS
  • 11.4 RECOMMENDATION FOR VALUE CHAIN PARTNERS
    • 11.4.1 DISRUPTIVE NETWORK ARCHITECTURE
    • 11.4.2 ACCESS
    • 11.4.3 SYSTEM LEVEL PRINCIPLES
    • 11.4.4 RIGHT BUSINESS MODEL
    • 11.4.5 STAKEHOLDER COMMUNITY
    • 11.4.6 POLICY AND STANDARDIZATION FRAMEWORK

Figures

  • Figure 1: Core Differences between 5G and 4G
  • Figure 2: Sample Specifications for 5G
  • Figure 3: Conceptual 5G Mobile Device
  • Figure 4: Mobile Terminal Network Layer in 5G Networks
  • Figure 5: 5G Timeline 2008 - 2021
  • Figure 6: 5G Challenges: Mobile SoC Performance vs. Energy Efficiency
  • Figure 7: 5G Technological Components
  • Figure 8: Massive MIMO Concept
  • Figure 9: NFV in H-RAN Solution
  • Figure 10: SDN Architecture
  • Figure 11: SDN Supporting Layers
  • Figure 12 Self-Organizing Networks (SONs) in H-RAN
  • Figure 13: H-RAN Application of 5G Systems
  • Figure 14: Centralized and Distribution LS-CSSP in H-CRANs
  • Figure 15: Software Defined Radio Network
  • Figure 16: Hybrid Architecture of SDN & SDR in 5G Network
  • Figure 17: Role of Satellite in 5G Communication System
  • Figure 18: METIS Regulatory Consortium
  • Figure 19: METIS Regulatory Framework
  • Figure 20: 5G Service Application Areas
  • Figure 21: Potential 5G Service Chart and Bandwidth & Latency Requirement
  • Figure 22: New Service Capabilities in 5G Environment
  • Figure 23: 5G Disruptive Capabilities
  • Figure 24: Performance Indicators of Disruptive Capabilities in 5G Network
  • Figure 25: 5G Network Design Architecture and Service Division
  • Figure 26: 5G Business Models
  • Figure 27: Key 5G Initiatives and Development Timeline
  • Figure 28: 5G Exploration to Development Phases
  • Figure 29: 5G Standardization Roadmap 2019 - 2024
  • Figure 30: 3GPP 5G Timeline
  • Figure 31: METIS HTs Structure
  • Figure 32: METIS WPs Structure
  • Figure 33: National 5G Project Phases
  • Figure 34: 5G Project Promotional Framework
  • Figure 35: Ericsson 5G Collaboration
  • Figure 36: Ericsson 5G Strategy Chart
  • Figure 37: Ericsson 5G Vision for Broadband
  • Figure 38: Ericsson 5G Vision for Smart Transport and Infrastructure
  • Figure 39: Ericsson 5G Vision for Media
  • Figure 40: Ericsson 5G Vision for Remote Devices
  • Figure 41: Ericsson 5G Vision for IoT
  • Figure 42: Alcatel-Lucent 5G Timeline
  • Figure 43: Alcatel-Lucent 5G Programmable Networking Framework
  • Figure 44: Alcatel-Lucent 5G Solutions
  • Figure 45: Fujitsu 5G Network Configurations and WLAN
  • Figure 46: Huawei 5G Service and Scenario Vision
  • Figure 47: Huawei 5G All-spectrum access RAN
  • Figure 48: Intel 5G Vision
  • Figure 49: NEC 5G Vision
  • Figure 50: NEC's Virtualization of Cell Concept
  • Figure 51: Architecture of Massive-Element Antenna
  • Figure 52: Samsung's 5G Service Vision
  • Figure 53: Samsung Rainbow Requirements
  • Figure 54: Samsung's FD-MIMO Concept
  • Figure 55: Samsung's Reconfigurable 5G Phased-array Antenna
  • Figure 56: Samsung's 5G Timeline
  • Figure 57: Samsung's 5G Trials
  • Figure 58: ZTE's Three Dimensional 5G Vision
  • Figure 59: Qualcomm 5G Scalability Chart
  • Figure 60: Qualcomm 5G Connectivity Design
  • Figure 61: Qualcomm Unified Platform Dimensions
  • Figure 62: Qualcomm 5G Timeline
  • Figure 63: Qualcomm 5G Business Model
  • Figure 64: Qualcomm Model to Leverage 4G Investment
  • Figure 65: Nokia 5G Vision and Requirements
  • Figure 66: Nokia 5G Network Design of Functional Requirement
  • Figure 67: NTT DoCoMo 5G Experimental Trial
  • Figure 68: Global 5G Investment (R&D and Trial)
  • Figure 69: 5G Investments (Large Scale, Lab R&D, Test Bed)
  • Figure 70: Global LTE Advance and 5G Subscriptions
  • Figure 71: Global 5G Only Subscriptions
  • Figure 72: Latency Comparison between LTE and 5G
  • Figure 73: End to End 5G Ecosystem
  • Figure 74: Total Global Mobile Operator 4G CAPEX Forecast
  • Figure 75: 5G Value Creation Capabilities

Tables

  • Table 1: OSl Layers by Category
  • Table 2: 5G Spectrum Band Options, Merits and Licenses
  • Table 3: MTC features in 3GPP Standard
  • Table 4: Roadmap for 5G Requirements
  • Table 5 Roadmap for 5G Wireless Subsystem
  • Table 6: Roadmap for Virtualization and Software Networks
  • Table 7: Roadmap for Converged Connectivity
  • Table 8: 5G PPP 19 Projects
  • Table 9: 5G Only Subscription APAC vs. NA vs. Europe vs. Others
  • Table 10: Mobile Operators' 5G Expectations
  • Table 11: Mobile Operators' Expectations of 5G Spectrum
  • Table 12: Mobile Operators' Expectation of 5G Service Levels
  • Table 13: Mobile Operators' Expectations of 5G Deployment by Region
  • Table 14 Mobile Operators' 5G Commercial Launch Expectations
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