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Market Research Report

Chronic Kidney Disease Market: Pipeline Review, Developer Landscape and Competitive Insights

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Chronic Kidney Disease Market: Pipeline Review, Developer Landscape and Competitive Insights
Published: November 15, 2018 Content info: 164 Pages
Description

Example Insights:

Overview:

Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is characterized by progressive loss of kidney function over a period of time. In most patients suffering from CKD, symptoms (such as swollen ankles, blood in urine and foamy urine) are rarely observed until kidney function has declined by 75%. It is worth highlighting that over 90% of the patients suffering from reduced kidney function are unaware of their medical condition.In the US, 15% of adults are reported to be suffering from mild or severe forms of CKD.In fact, the mean global prevalence of CKD, across all five stages of the disease, is estimated to be 13.4%. Limited availability of epidemiological data, lack of awareness, late diagnosis and inappropriate / incorrect treatment are some of the factors responsible for elevating disease incidence. It is also worth noting that developed nations spend over 2-3% of their annual healthcare budget on the treatment of end-stage renal disease (ESRD); however, the economic burden associated with milder forms of CKD is almost double the total costs incurred in the treatment of ESRD. Further, in the US, the disease has been estimated to incur combined direct and indirect costs ranging between USD 1,183 - USD 35,292 per patient, per month.

Existing therapeutic options have already been proven to be inadequate in containing the progression of the disease and its symptoms in the long term. Currently, several stakeholders in the pharmaceutical industry are engaged in efforts to advance the development of various types of disease modifying pharmacological interventions and therapies that offer symptomatic relief. In fact, multiple initiatives by start-ups are being backed by venture capital funding in order to expedite the development of potential therapeutic options for better disease management.

Scope of the Report:

The “Chronic Kidney Disease Market: Pipeline Review, Developer Landscape and Competitive Insights” report provides an extensive study on the marketed, clinical and preclinical molecules available / being developed for the treatment of chronic kidney disease. Figure 1 summarizes the scope of the report and the specific modules that have been covered in detail in the document.

Amongst other elements, the report includes:

  • A detailed assessment of the current market landscape, providing information on drug developer(s), phase of development (marketed, clinical and preclinical / discovery stage), type of molecule (small molecule or biologic), treatment type (disease modifying agent or drugs offering symptomatic relief), mechanism of action, and route of administration of the drugs being developed for the treatment of chronic kidney disease.
  • An in-depth analysis of the product pipeline and developer companies, featuring three schematic representations; these include [A] a heptagon representation, highlighting the distribution of the marketed and development stage molecules based on the target clinical condition, [B] a 2X2 grid analysis, representing the distribution of drug candidates across various disease indications, dosing frequencies and stages of development, and [C] a diagrammatic representation of the regional landscape of industry players involved in the development of drugs in this domain, distributed based on the location of their headquarters.
  • An insightful market assessment summary, highlighting the clinical and commercial attractiveness of pipeline molecules (phase II and phase III), taking into consideration size of enrolled patient population (for the trial in the highest phase of development), route of administration, treatment type (disease modifying agent and drugs offering symptomatic relief) and dosing frequency (for quantifying clinical attractiveness), and target patient population, expected launch date and size of developer company (for quantifying commercial attractiveness).
  • An analysis highlighting the key unmet needs across chronic kidney disease, featuring insights generated from real-time data on unmet needs as identified from social media posts, recent publications, patient blogs and the views of key opinion leaders expressed on online platforms.
  • An insightful competitive analysis, highlighting the key players in the domain on the basis of the strength of their respective development portfolios, taking into account company size and the stage of development of lead molecules in their respective pipelines.
  • A detailed analysis identifying the key opinion leaders (KOLs), featuring a 2X2 analysis to assess the relative experience of certain KOLs who were shortlisted based on their contributions (in terms of involvement in various clinical studies) to this field.
  • An analysis of the partnerships that have been established in the recent past, covering R&D collaborations, licensing agreements, mergers and acquisitions, product development and commercialization agreements, manufacturing agreements and others
  • An analysis of the investments made at various stages of development in companies that are focused in this area, including seed financing, venture capital financing, debt financing, grants, capital raised from IPOs and subsequent offerings.

The research, analysis and insights presented in this report is backed by a deep understanding of insights gathered from secondary sources. The opinions and insights presented in this study were influenced by inputs of several key players in this domain. All actual figures have been sourced and analyzed from publicly available information forums and inputs from primary research. Financial figures mentioned in this report are in USD, unless otherwise specified.

Chapter 2 provides an executive summary of the insights captured in our research. It offers a high-level view on the likely evolution of the chronic kidney disease market in the long term.

Chapter 3 provides an introduction to chronic kidney disease and its associated comorbidities. It features a detailed discussion on the development, symptoms and stages of the condition, factors influencing disease progression and the various treatment regimens that are available in the market. It also includes a discussion on the epidemiology of the disease and the associated economic burden across various regions.

Chapter 4 includes information on over 160 molecules that are currently approved / under development for therapeutic use. It features a comprehensive analysis of pipeline molecules, highlighting the phase of development (clinical, preclinical / discovery stage), type of molecule (small molecule or biologic), treatment type (disease modifying agent or drugs offering symptomatic relief), mechanism of action, and route of administration of the drug candidates. In addition, it presents certain key insights derived from the study, which include a heptagon representation highlighting the distribution of the marketed and pipeline molecules based on different clinical indications. The chapter includes a comprehensive 2X2 grid analysis, representing the distribution of drug candidates across various indications, dosing frequencies and stages of development. Additionally, the chapter features a regional landscape of developers engaged in this domain, distributed on the basis of the location of their headquarters.

Chapter 5 features an analysis of the clinical and commercial attractiveness of the drugs designed for the treatment of CKD and its associated comorbidities. The drugs are plotted on a 2X2 matrix, with clinical attractiveness (abscissa) and commercial attractiveness (ordinate) as the two axes. The clinical attractiveness of a drug is determined by sample size of its trial (highest phase), route of administration, treatment type (disease modifying agent and drugs offering symptomatic relief) and dosage frequency. The commercial attractiveness of a drug is determined by the target population size, expected launch date and the company size.

Chapter 6 highlights the key unmet needs associated with the management and treatment of chronic kidney disease. The chapter provides detailed analysis of unmet needs that were identified from views expressed by patients / experts across different platforms, such as social media posts, recent publications and patient blogs, and the inputs of key opinion leaders at conferences / symposiums. The chapter presents an insightful sentiment analysis and word cloud analysis, summarizing the opinions expressed across public portals.

Chapter 7 presents an analysis of the competitive landscape of companies involved in the development of novel therapeutics for the treatment of chronic kidney disease. It is based on the number of molecules in the pipelines of different players (taking into consideration the current status of development) and company size (in terms of number of employees). In this analysis, companies across different regions (North America, Europe and Asia-Pacific) were plotted on 2X2 matrices, having company pipeline strengthas the ordinate and company size as the abscissa.

Chapter 8 provides an analysis of KOLs in the field of chronic kidney disease. It features a comprehensive list of principal investigators of different clinical trials, along with information related to the affiliated research institutes. The chapter features a schematic representation on a world map, highlighting the geographical locations of eminent scientists / researchers who are engaged in clinical research in this domain. It also features a comparative analysis, highlighting those KOLs who have relatively more experience in this domain.

Chapter 9 features an analysis of the various collaborations and partnerships that have been inked amongst players in this market. We have also discussed the different partnership models (including product development and commercialization, R&D agreements, technology / product licensing agreements, other licensing agreements, mergers / acquisitions and clinical trial collaborations) and the most common forms of deals / agreements that have been established between 2015 to 2018.

Chapter 10 presents details on various investments received by companies that are engaged in this domain. It also includes an analysis of the funding instances that have taken place in the market, in the period between 2010 and July 2018, highlighting the growing interest of the venture capital community and other strategic investors in this market.

Chapter 11 is an appendix, which provides tabulated data and numbers for all the figures included in the report.

Chapter 12 is an appendix, which contains the list of companies and organizations mentioned in the report.

Table of Contents
Product Code: RA100C04

Table of Contents

1. PREFACE

  • 1.1. Scope of the Report
  • 1.2. Research Methodology
  • 1.3. Chapter Outlines

2. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

3. INTRODUCTION

  • 3.1. An Overview of Chronic Kidney Diseases
    • 3.1.1. Medical Conditions Associated with Chronic Kidney Diseases
      • 3.1.1.1. Alport Syndrome
      • 3.1.1.2. Diabetic Nephropathy
      • 3.1.1.3. Focal Segmental Glomerulosclerosis
      • 3.1.1.4. Glomerulonephritis
      • 3.1.1.5. Nephrotic Syndrome
      • 3.1.1.6. Polycystic Kidney Disease
      • 3.1.1.7. Hypertensive Kidney Disease
      • 3.1.1.8. Pyelonephritis
    • 3.1.2. Stages of Chronic Kidney Disease
    • 3.1.3. Symptoms Associated with Chronic Kidney Disease
    • 3.1.4. Diagnosis of Chronic Kidney Disease
    • 3.1.5. Treatment Options for Chronic Kidney Disease
      • 3.1.5.1. Therapeutics
      • 3.1.5.2. Other Modalities
    • 3.1.6. Kidney Transplant and Implications

4. PIPELINE REVIEW: MARKETED AND DEVELOPMENT DRUGS

  • 4.1. Chapter Overview
  • 4.2. Drugs for Chronic Kidney Disease: Marketed and Development Pipeline
  • 4.3. Chronic Kidney Disease: Pipeline Analysis
    • 4.3.1. Analysis by Phase of Development
    • 4.3.2. Analysis by Type of Molecule
    • 4.3.3. Analysis by Type of Treatment
    • 4.3.4. Analysis by Type of Therapy
    • 4.3.5. Analysis by Type of Receptor
    • 4.3.6. Analysis by Route of Administration
    • 4.3.7. Analysis by Target Therapeutic Indication(s)
    • 4.3.8. Analysis by Size of Developer
    • 4.3.9. Analysis of Leading Developers
    • 4.3.10. Analysis by Size and Location of the Players
    • 4.3.11. Heptagon Representation: Distribution by Target Therapeutic Indication and Phase of Development
    • 4.3.12. Grid Analysis: Distribution by Target Therapeutic Indication, Dosing Frequency and Phase of Development
    • 4.3.13. Geographical Landscape

5. PRODUCT CLINICAL COMMERCIAL ATTRACTIVENESS

  • 5.1. Chapter Overview
  • 5.2. Methodology
    • 5.2.1. Assumptions and Key Parameters
  • 5.3. Affiliated Insights
    • 5.3.1. Clinical and Commercial Attractiveness Analysis: Anemia
    • 5.3.2. Clinical and Commercial Attractiveness Analysis: Diabetic Nephropathy and Nephrotic Syndrome
    • 5.3.3. Clinical and Commercial Attractiveness Analysis: Focal Segmental Glomerulosclerosis
    • 5.3.4. Clinical and Commercial Attractiveness Analysis: Lupus Nephritis and Pyelonephritis
    • 5.3.5. Clinical and Commercial Attractiveness Analysis: IgA Nephropathy
    • 5.3.6. Clinical and Commercial Attractiveness Analysis: CKD (Indication Unspecified)

6. CHRONIC KIDNEY DISEASE: UNMET NEEDS ANALYSIS

  • 6.1. Chapter Overview
  • 6.2. Unmet Needs Analysis in Chronic Kidney Disease Market
    • 6.2.1. Analysis of Data from Patient Blogs
      • 6.2.1.1. Methodology
      • 6.2.1.2. Key Insights
    • 6.2.2. Analysis of Data from Published Literature
      • 6.2.2.1. Methodology
      • 6.2.2.2. Key Insights
    • 6.2.3. Analysis of Data from Social Media Platforms
      • 6.2.3.1. Methodology
      • 6.2.3.2. Key Insights
    • 6.2.4. Expert opinions
      • 6.2.4.1. Titte Srinivas, Intermountain Medical Centre
      • 6.2.4.2. Brian Clement, Hippocrates Health Institute
      • 6.2.4.3. Frank Brennan, Palliative Care Physician
      • 6.2.4.4. Sarah Brook, Renal Dietitian, Salford Royal NHS Foundation Trust
      • 6.2.4.5. Joseph Selvanayagam, Medical Researcher, Flinders University
      • 6.2.4.6. Vanessa Rojas-Bautista, UC Irvine Health
    • 6.2.5. Summary of Key Unmet Needs in Chronic Kidney Disease

7. COMPANY COMPETITIVENESS ANALYSIS

  • 7.1. Chapter Overview
    • 7.1.1. Assumptions and Key Parameters
  • 7.2. Company Competitiveness Analysis: Key Insights
    • 7.2.1. Key Players: North America
    • 7.2.2. Key Players: Europe
    • 7.2.3. Key Players: Asia Pacific

8. KOL ANALYSIS

  • 8.1. Chapter Overview
  • 8.2. Methodology
  • 8.3. Principal Investigators Involved in Clinical Trials
  • 8.4. Prominent Key Opinion Leaders
    • 8.4.1. Geographical Distribution
  • 8.5. Most Active Key Opinion Leaders
    • 8.5.1. KOL Profiles: Dennis Andress
    • 8.5.2. KOL Profile: Geoffrey A Block
    • 8.5.3. KOL Profile: Glenn Chertow
    • 8.5.4. KOL Profile: Steven Fishbane

9. PARTNERSHIPS AND COLLABORATIONS

  • 9.1. Chapter Overview
  • 9.2. Partnership Models
  • 9.3. Novel Therapeutics for Chronic Kidney Disease: List of Partnerships and Collaborations
    • 9.3.1. Analysis by Year of Partnerships
    • 9.3.2. Analysis by Type of Partnership
    • 9.3.3. Most Active Players: Analysis by Number of Partnerships
    • 9.3.4. Regional Analysis
      • 9.3.4.1. Intercontinental and Intracontinental Agreements

10. FUNDING AND INVESTMENT ANALYSIS

  • 10.1. Chapter Overview
  • 10.2. Types of Funding
  • 10.3. Chronic Kidney Disease Market: Funding and Investment Analysis
    • 10.3.1. Analysis by Number of Instances
    • 10.3.2. Analysis by Amount Invested
    • 10.3.3. Analysis by Type of Funding
    • 10.3.4. Analysis by Most Active Players
    • 10.3.5. Analysis by Most Active Investors
  • 10.4. Concluding Remarks

11. APPENDIX 1: TABULATED DATA

  • 11.1. Chapter Overview
  • 11.2. Key Takeaways

12. APPENDIX 2: LIST OF COMPANIES AND ORGANIZATIONS

List Of Figures

  • Figure 1.1: Chronic Kidney Disease: Scope and Competitive Insights
  • Figure 3.1: Epidemiology of Chronic Kidney Disease
  • Figure 3.2: Factors Involved in the Progression of Diabetic Nephropathy
  • Figure 3.3: Symptoms of Chronic Kidney Disease
  • Figure 3.4: Diagnostic Techniques for Chronic Kidney Disease
  • Figure 3.5: Treatment Options for Chronic Kidney Disease
  • Figure 3.6: ACE Inhibitors: Mechanism of Action
  • Figure 3.7: Statins: Mechanism of Action
  • Figure 3.8: Loop Diuretics: Mechanism of Action
  • Figure 3.9: Thiazide Diuretics: Mechanism of Action
  • Figure 3.10: Complications Associated with Kidney Transplants
  • Figure 4.1: Pipeline Analysis: Distribution by Phase of Development
  • Figure 4.2: Pipeline Analysis: Distribution by Type of Molecule
  • Figure 4.3: Pipeline Analysis: Distribution by Type of Treatment
  • Figure 4.4: Pipeline Analysis: Distribution by Type of Therapy
  • Figure 4.5: Pipeline Analysis: Distribution by Type of Receptor
  • Figure 4.6: Pipeline Analysis: Distribution by Route of Administration
  • Figure 4.7: Pipeline Analysis: Distribution by Target Therapeutic Indication(s)
  • Figure 4.8: Pipeline Analysis: Distribution by Size of Employee Base of Developer
  • Figure 4.9: Pipeline Analysis: Leading Players
  • Figure 4.10: Pipeline Analysis: Distribution by Size and Location
  • Figure 4.11: Heptagon Representation: Distribution by Target Therapeutic Indication and Phase of Development
  • Figure 4.12: Grid Analysis: Distribution by Target Therapeutic Indication, Dosing Frequency and Phase of Development
  • Figure 4.13: Geographical Landscape
  • Figure 5.1: Clinical Commercial Attractiveness: Phase III and Phase II Molecules for Anemia
  • Figure 5.2: Clinical Commercial Attractiveness: Phase III and Phase II Molecules for Diabetic Nephropathy and Nephrotic Syndrome
  • Figure 5.3: Clinical Commercial Attractiveness: Phase III and Phase II Molecules for Focal Segmental Glomerulosclerosis
  • Figure 5.4: Clinical Commercial Attractiveness: Phase III and Phase II Molecules for Lupus Nephritis and Pyelonephritis
  • Figure 5.5: Clinical Commercial Attractiveness: Phase III and Phase II Molecules for IgA Nephropathy
  • Figure 5.6: Clinical Commercial Attractiveness: Phase III and Phase II Molecules for CKD (Indication Unspecified)
  • Figure 6.1: Unmet Needs Analysis: Overview of the Methodology
  • Figure 6.2: Unmet Needs in the Chronic Kidney Disease Market: Word Cloud Analysis of Data from Patient Blogs
  • Figure 6.3: Chronic Kidney Disease: Unmet Needs Highlighted in Published Literature
  • Figure 6.4: Unmet Needs in Chronic Kidney Disease: Social Media Platforms, Sentiment Analysis
  • Figure 6.5: Unmet Needs in Chronic Kidney Disease: Word Cloud Analysis of Data from Social Media Tweets
  • Figure 6.6: Unmet Needs in Chronic Kidney Disease, Social Media Analysis: Indication Specific Word Clouds
  • Figure 6.7: Unmet Needs in Chronic Kidney Disease, Social Media Analysis: Indication Specific Word Clouds
  • Figure 6.8: Chronic Kidney Disease: Key Unmet Needs
  • Figure 7.1: Company Competitiveness Analysis: North America
  • Figure 7.2: Company Competitiveness Analysis: Europe
  • Figure 7.3: Company Competitiveness Analysis: Asia Pacific
  • Figure 8.1: KOL Analysis: Dot-Plot of Principal Investigators
  • Figure 8.2: KOL Analysis: Geographical Location of Principal Investigators
  • Figure 8.3: KOL Analysis: Most Active Key Opinion Leaders
  • Figure 9.1: Partnerships and Collaborations: Cumulative Trend by Year, 2015-2018
  • Figure 9.2: Partnerships and Collaborations: Distribution by Type of Partnership
  • Figure 9.3: Partnerships and Collaborations: Most Active Players
  • Figure 9.4: Partnerships and Collaborations: Regional Distribution
  • Figure 9.5: Partnerships and Collaborations: Intercontinental and Intracontinental Distribution
  • Figure 10.1: Funding and Investment Analysis: Cumulative Number of Instances, 2010-2018
  • Figure 10.2: Funding and Investment Analysis: Cumulative Amount Invested, 2010-2018 (USD Million)
  • Figure 10.3: Funding and Investment Analysis: Distribution by Type of Funding, 2010-2018
  • Figure 10.4: Funding and Investment Analysis: Distribution of Total Amount Invested by Type of Funding, 2010-2018 (USD Million)
  • Figure 10.5: Chronic Kidney Disease: Summary of Investments, January 2010-July 2018 (USD Million)
  • Figure 10.6: Funding and Investment Analysis: Most Active Players
  • Figure 10.7: Funding and Investment Analysis: Most Active Investors
  • Figure 10.8: Funding and Investment Summary

List Of Tables

  • Table 3.1: Indicative Values of Focal Segmental Glomerulosclerosis
  • Table 3.2: Stages of Chronic Kidney Disease
  • Table 4.1: Chronic Kidney Disease: Marketed and Development Pipeline
  • Table 8.1: KOL Analysis: List of Principal Investigators
  • Table 8.2: KOL Analysis: List of Universities and Hospitals
  • Table 8.3: KOL Analysis: Scoring System
  • Table 8.4: KOL Profile: Dennis Andress, Clinical Trials
  • Table 8.5: KOL Profile: Dennis Andress, Published Literature
  • Table 8.6: KOL Profile: Geoffrey A Block, Clinical Trials
  • Table 8.7: KOL Profile: Geoffrey A Block, Published Literature
  • Table 8.8: KOL Profile: Glenn Chertow, Clinical Trials
  • Table 8.9: KOL Profile: Glenn Chertow, Published Literature
  • Table 8.10: KOL Profile: Steven Fishbane, Clinical Trials
  • Table 8.11: KOL Profile: Steven Fishbane, Published Literature
  • Table 9.1: Novel Therapeutics for Chronic Kidney Disease: Partnerships and Collaborations, 2015-2018
  • Table 10.1: Chronic Kidney Disease Market: Funding and Investments, 2010-2018
  • Table 10.2: Funding and Investment Analysis: Summary of Investments
  • Table 11.1: Chronic Kidney Disease: Summary of the Competitive Insights
  • Table 12.1: Epidemiology of Chronic Kidney Disease
  • Table 12.2: Pipeline Analysis: Distribution by Phase of Development
  • Table 12.3: Pipeline Analysis: Distribution by Type of Molecule
  • Table 12.4: Pipeline Analysis: Distribution by Type of Treatment
  • Table 12.5: Pipeline Analysis: Distribution by Type of Therapy
  • Table 12.6: Pipeline Analysis: Distribution by Type of Receptor
  • Table 12.7: Pipeline Analysis: Distribution by Route of Administration
  • Table 12.8: Pipeline Analysis: Distribution by Target Therapeutic Indication(s)
  • Table 12.9: Pipeline Analysis: Distribution by Size of Developer
  • Table 12.10: Pipeline Analysis: Leading Players
  • Table 12.11: Pipeline Analysis: Distribution by Size and Location of the Players
  • Table 12.12: Heptagon Representation: Distribution by Type of Indication and Development Stage
  • Table 12.13: Grid Analysis: Distribution by Target Therapeutic Indication, Dosing Frequency and Phase of Development
  • Table 12.14: Geographical Landscape Analysis: Distribution by Developers and their Headquarters
  • Table 12.15: Unmet Needs in Chronic Kidney Disease: Needs Highlighted in Published Literature
  • Table 12.16: Unmet Needs in Chronic Kidney Disease: Social Media Platforms, Sentiment Analysis
  • Table 12.17: Unmet Needs in Chronic Kidney Disease, Social Media Analysis: Indication Specific Tweets
  • Table 12.18: Partnerships and Collaborations: Cumulative Trend by Year, 2015-2018
  • Table 12.19: Partnerships and Collaborations: Distribution by Type of Partnership
  • Table 12.20: Partnerships and Collaborations: Most Active Players
  • Table 12.21: Partnerships and Collaborations: Regional Distribution
  • Table 12.22: Partnerships and Collaborations: Intercontinental and Intracontinental Distribution
  • Table 12.23: Funding and Investment Analysis: Cumulative Number of Instances, 2010-2018
  • Table 12.24: Funding and Investment Analysis: Cumulative Amount Invested, 2010-2018 (USD Million)
  • Table 12.25: Funding and Investment Analysis: Distribution by Type of Funding, 2010-2018
  • Table 12.26: Funding and Investment Analysis: Distribution of Total Amount Invested by Type of Funding, 2010-2018 (USD Million)
  • Table 12.27: Chronic Kidney Disease: Summary of Investments, January 2010-July 2018 (USD Million)
  • Table 12.28: Funding and Investment Analysis: Most Active Players
  • Table 12.29: Funding and Investment Analysis: Most Active Investors
  • Table 12.30: Funding and Investment Summary

Listed Companies

The following companies and organizations have been mentioned in the report:

  • Aarhus University
  • Achillion Pharmaceuticals
  • Advantech Capital
  • AJU IB Investment
  • Akebia Therapeutics
  • Albany College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences
  • Alexandria Venture Investments
  • Alexion Pharmaceuticals
  • Algomedix
  • Allegheny Financial Group
  • Amgen
  • Amyndas Pharmaceuticals
  • Angion Biomedica
  • Anthera Pharmaceuticals
  • apceth Biopharma
  • Apellis Pharmaceuticals
  • AptaBio Therapeutics
  • Apollo Hospitals
  • Ardelyx
  • Armetheon
  • Asahi Kasei Pharma
  • Astellas Pharma
  • AstraZeneca
  • Aurinia Pharmaceuticals
  • Avexxin
  • Barclays Bank
  • Bay City Capital
  • Bayer
  • Baylor College of Medicine
  • Beijing Anzhen Hospital
  • Bichat-Claude Bernard Hospital
  • Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation
  • BIOCAD
  • BioVirtus
  • BLR Bio
  • Boehringer Ingelheim
  • Boryung Pharmaceutical
  • Bristol-Myers Squibb
  • Calliditas Therapeutics
  • California Institute of Renal Research
  • Cara Therapeutics
  • CARB-X
  • Cash Capital
  • Cedars-Sinai Medical Center
  • Cellmid
  • Celgene
  • Centre Hospitalier Universitaire
  • China Medical University Hospital
  • Children's Mercy Hospital
  • ChemoCentryx
  • Chugai Pharmaceutical
  • Clough Capital
  • Complexa
  • Concert Pharmaceuticals
  • Cormorant Asset Management
  • Cowen Healthcare Investments
  • Cowin Capital Group
  • Creighton University
  • CTI Life Sciences Fund
  • CuraGen
  • Cycad Group
  • Daiichi Sankyo
  • DaVita Clinical Research
  • Sumitomo Dainippon Pharma
  • DiaMedica Therapeutics
  • Dimerix
  • Dong-A ST
  • Dongguk University
  • Duke University
  • Dynavax Technologies
  • Eastern Capital
  • EcoR1 Capital
  • Edmond de Rothschild Investment Partners
  • Efung Capital
  • Ege University
  • ElexoPharm
  • Eli Lilly and Company
  • Elite Capital
  • Ember Therapeutics
  • Epidarex Capital
  • Epigen Biosciences
  • Espero BioPharma
  • Evanston Northwestern Hospital
  • Evotec
  • Flagship Pioneering
  • Foresee Pharmaceuticals
  • F-Prime Capital Partners
  • Fresenius Medical Care
  • Fudan University
  • Galencia
  • Galectin Therapeutics
  • Gazi University
  • Gabriele d'Annunzio' University
  • Genentech
  • Genexine
  • Genkyotex
  • Georgetown University
  • George Washington University
  • Gilead Sciences
  • GlaxoSmithKline
  • Glycadia Pharmaceuticals
  • GNI Group
  • Goldfinch Bio
  • Goldman Sachs
  • Gujarat Kidney Foundation
  • Hadassah Medical Center
  • Hamad Medical
  • H.C. Wainwright
  • Hanmi Pharmaceutical
  • Hansa Medical
  • HBM Healthcare Investments
  • Hennepin Healthcare
  • Heidelberg University
  • Hercules Capital
  • Hermed Capital
  • Hoffmann-La Roche
  • Hospital Aleman
  • Human Genome Sciences
  • Hydra Biosciences
  • Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai
  • Idera Pharmaceuticals
  • Indiana University
  • Innovation Network Corporation of Japan
  • Inositec
  • inRegen
  • Inselspital
  • Ionis Pharmaceuticals
  • Iran University of Medical Sciences
  • Ironwood Pharmaceuticals
  • Italian Hospital
  • JAFCO
  • Janssen Pharmaceuticals
  • Japan Tobacco International
  • Jiangsu Maslech Medical Technology
  • Johns Hopkins University
  • JPMorgan Chase
  • Kadmon
  • KAI Pharmaceuticals
  • KBP Biosciences
  • Keryx Biopharmaceuticals
  • Kezar Life Sciences
  • King's College London
  • KISSEI Pharmaceutical
  • Klotho Therapeutics
  • Knight Therapeutics
  • Konkuk University
  • Korea Investment Partners
  • Kyowa Hakko Kirin
  • Kyung Hee University
  • L&F Research
  • La Jolla Pharmaceutical
  • Lanthio Pharma
  • Lawson Health Research Institute
  • LCR Clinical Research
  • Lexicon Pharmaceuticals
  • LG Life Sciences
  • Limulus Venture Partners
  • London Health Sciences Centre
  • Longitude Capital
  • Lonza
  • Mallinckrodt Pharmaceuticals
  • Mannkind Corporation
  • Mariel Therapeutics
  • Maruishi Pharmaceutical
  • Massachusetts General Hospital
  • Mayo Clinic
  • McMaster University
  • Medicxi Ventures
  • MedImmune
  • Medical University of Graz
  • Medipal Holdings
  • Medison Pharma
  • Megapharm
  • Merck Serono
  • Merck Sharp & Dohme
  • Michigan State University
  • Mission Therapeutics
  • Mitsubishi Tanabe Pharma
  • Morningside Ventures
  • MRL Ventures Fund
  • National Taiwan University Hospital
  • Nephrotic Syndrome Study Network
  • New Enterprise Associates
  • Necker-Enfants Malades Hospital
  • NorthShore University HealthSystem
  • Novadiol
  • Novartis Institutes for Biomedical Research
  • Novartis Pharmaceuticals
  • Novo Nordisk
  • NOXXON Pharma
  • Omega Funds
  • OPKO Health
  • Orange County Research Center
  • Oraxion Therapeutics
  • OrbiMed
  • Orbis Biosciences
  • Oregon Health & Science University
  • Ottawa Hospital Research Institute
  • Otsuka Pharmaceuticals
  • Oxford Finance
  • University of Oxford
  • Palladio Biosciences
  • Pappas Ventures
  • Paranta Biosciences
  • Pfizer
  • Pfizer Venture Investments
  • Pharmacosmos
  • Ping An Ventures
  • PKD Foundation
  • Polaris Partners
  • Prometic Life Sciences
  • Proteomics International
  • Proteon Therapeutics
  • Qiming Venture Partners
  • Queen Mary's Hospital
  • Reata Pharmaceuticals
  • Redx Pharma
  • Regulus Therapeutics
  • Relypsa
  • Resverlogix
  • Retrophin
  • Rigel Pharmaceuticals
  • Roche
  • Rockwell Medical
  • UC San Diego School of Medicine
  • Sahlgrenska University Hospital
  • Sandoz
  • Sangel Capital
  • Sanifit
  • Sanofi
  • SCOHIA PHARMA
  • SDIC Venture Capital
  • Sectoral Asset Management
  • Seoul National University
  • Seoul St. Mary's Hospital
  • Serodus
  • Serum Institute of India
  • Severance Hospital
  • St. George's University
  • Fosun Pharma
  • Samsung Medical Center
  • Shenyang Sunshine Pharmaceutical
  • Shenzhen Hepalink Pharmaceutical
  • Shield Therapeutics
  • Sibling Capital Ventures
  • Silicon Valley Bank
  • Silver Creek Pharmaceuticals
  • SK Group
  • Sofinnova Ventures
  • Stanford University
  • Taipei Medical University
  • Taisho Pharmaceutical
  • Takeda Pharmaceuticals
  • Teijin Pharma
  • Tel Aviv Sourasky Medical Center
  • The Medical University of South Carolina
  • Toronto General Hospital
  • Theravance Biopharma
  • The George Institute for Global Health
  • The Rogosin Institute
  • Third Rock Ventures
  • Thynk Capital
  • Tokai University
  • Trevi Therapeutics
  • Tricida
  • Trisaq
  • TR-Pharm
  • Tufts Medical Center
  • UnicoCell Biomed
  • Unicyte
  • The University of Alabama
  • University Hospitals Birmingham
  • The University of British Columbia
  • University of California
  • University of Calgary
  • University of Cincinnati
  • University of Frankfurt
  • University of Giessen
  • University of Guadalajara
  • University of Illinois
  • University of Kentucky
  • University of Leeds
  • University of Louisville
  • University of Manitoba
  • University of Maryland
  • University of Michigan
  • University of Minnesota
  • University of Missouri
  • University of North Carolina
  • University of Oklahoma
  • University Hospital Center De Montpellier
  • University of Montreal
  • University of Pennsylvania
  • University of Ulsan
  • University of Utah
  • University of Wisconsin
  • University Hospital Bonn
  • Uppsala University Hospital
  • University of Zurich
  • Vanderbilt University Medical Center
  • Variant Pharmaceuticals
  • venBio Global Strategic Fund
  • venBio Select
  • Venrock Healthcare Capital Partners
  • Verily Life Sciences
  • Vertex Venture Holdings
  • Vidasym
  • Vifor Fresenius Medical Care Renal Pharma
  • Vifor Pharma
  • Visterra
  • Vivo Capital
  • Washington University School of Medicine
  • Watson Laboratories
  • Wellington Management
  • XORTX Therapeutics
  • Yuhan Corporation
  • Zeria Pharmaceutical
  • ZS
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