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Market Research Report
Product code
1016536

DED and Large-Format Additive Manufacturing Markets: 2021-2030

Published: | SmarTech Analysis | 70 Pages | Delivery time: 1-2 business days

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DED and Large-Format Additive Manufacturing Markets: 2021-2030
Published: October 12, 2021
SmarTech Analysis
Content info: 70 Pages
Delivery time: 1-2 business days
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  • Description
  • Table of Contents
Description

This report identifies the opportunities presented by Directed Energy Deposition manufacturing (DED) technology and other large-format metal additive manufacturing machines. Coverage of this report includes large-format PFB and also variants on the theme such as WAAM and a variety of semi-proprietary processes. Many of these processes are rapid but rough cut and require significant post processing. In other words, the machines covered in this report are closer to machine tools than 3D printers and as such we are also covering hybrid machines which combine the functionality of additive manufacturing with CNC capability.

The report takes a look at both powder-based and wire-based processes and the opportunities for large-format machines for metal-oriented service bureaus. A major part of the report consists of a ten-year forecast of large-format machines and related materials with breakouts by types of process, materials used, service bureau vs. in-house, wire vs. powder and hybrid vs. pure AM. Both volume and value projections are included for all the forecasts. Finally, this report includes profiles of the large-format strategies of 35 companies active in the DED/large-format space.

Table of Contents
Product Code: SMP-AM-DED2021-0621

Table of Contents

Chapter One: DED and Other Large-Format Metal AM Technology

  • 1.1. How Large-Format Processes Fit into the AM Sector
    • 1.1.1. Wire and Powder-based Processes
    • 1.1.2. Print Speeds, Quality of Output and Post-Processing
  • 1.2. DED
  • 1.3. WAAM
  • 1.3. Large-format PFB
  • 1.4. Other Large-format AM Processes including Semi-proprietary Processes
  • 1.5. Hybrid Large-Format Machines
  • 1.6. A Note on Polymer Large-format Processing
  • 1.7. Key Points from this Chapter

Chapter Two: Applications, End Users and Forecasts

  • 2.1. Where and How DED/large-format Machines Being Used Today
    • 2.1.1. Aerospace
    • 2.1.2. Automotive
    • 2.1.3. Medical
    • 2.1.4. General Industry and Tooling
    • 2.1.5. Other Uses
  • 2.2. DED/Large-format Processes in Service Bureaus
  • 2.3. Key Points from this Chapter

Chapter Three: Ten-Year Market forecasts of DED/Large-Format AM

  • 3.1. Forecasting Methodology
  • 3.2. DED/Large-Format Machines by Type: Shipments, Install Base and Market Value
  • 3.3. DED/Large-Format Machines by End-User Industry: Shipments, Install Base and Market Value
  • 3.4. DED/Large-Format Machines/Service Revenues for Service Bureaus
  • 3.5. DED/Large-Format Machines by Location of End User
  • 3.6. Materials (Wire and Powder) Consumed by DED/Large Format Machines
  • 3.7. Key Points from this Chapter

Chapter Four: DED/Large Format Machines: Vendor

  • 4.1. 3D Hybrid Solutions
  • 4.2. ADDere
  • 4.3. Additec
  • 4.4. Arevo
  • 4.5. Baker Industries
  • 4.6. BeAM
  • 4.7. Bro-beam
  • 4.8. Digital Alloys
  • 4.9. DM3D
  • 4.10. DMG Mori
  • 4.11. ELB-Schliff
  • 4.12. EML 3D
  • 4.13. Evobeam
  • 4.14. Farsoon
  • 4.15. FormAlloy
  • 4.16. InssTek
  • 4.17. Hybrid Manufacturing Technologies
  • 4.18. Laser Cladding Ventures
  • 4.19. Lincoln Electric
  • 4.20. Mazak
  • 4.21. Mitsubishi Industries
  • 4.22. MX3D
  • 4.23. New Beam
  • 4.24. Okuma (Japan)
  • 4.25. OR Laser/Coherent (Germany)
  • 4.26. Prima Additive
  • 4.27. Norsk Titanium
  • 4.28. Optomec
  • 4.29. Rausch Titanium
  • 4.30Relativity
  • 4.31. RPM Innovations
  • 4.32. Sciaky
  • 4.33. Titomic
  • 4.34. Trumpf
  • 4.35. XBeam3D